Former FCC Chairman Makes Lucrative Leap to Private Sector

U.S. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski announces he is stepping down during a staff meeting at the FCC headquarters March 22, 2013 in Washington, DC. Appointed to the FCC by President Barack Obama in 2009, Genachowski fought battles over the openess of the Internet and pushed the agency to look at telecommunications differently as broadband supplanted old technologies like broadcasting and telephone service. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
National Journal
Laura Ryan
Jan. 6, 2014, 5:41 a.m.

Ju­li­us Gen­achow­ski, former chair­man of the Fed­er­al Com­mu­nic­a­tions Com­mis­sion, be­gins his first day of work Monday at a D.C.-based private-equity be­hemoth, the Carlyle Group.

Gen­achow­ski will help run the U.S. buy­out team in his first ma­jor post-FCC role, the firm an­nounced Monday. He will fo­cus on tech­no­logy, me­dia, and tele­com in­vest­ments.

“Deep in­dustry spe­cial­iz­a­tion is core to our in­vest­ment strategy, and Ju­li­us brings a wealth of know­ledge and ex­per­i­ence to these sec­tors. His judg­ment about how these sec­tors will evolve will be in­valu­able to us,” said Pete Clare, co-head of the U.S. buy­out team, in a state­ment.

The former FCC chair­man fol­lows in the foot­steps of a long line of prom­in­ent politi­cians, in­clud­ing former Pres­id­ent George H. W. Bush and Sec­ret­ary of State James Baker, who took luc­rat­ive private-sec­tor jobs with the Carlyle Group after de­part­ing pub­lic ser­vice.

After leav­ing the agency in May, Gen­achow­ski was a fel­low at the As­pen In­sti­tute, a non­par­tis­an think tank, and taught a joint course at Har­vard’s Busi­ness and Law schools.

Dur­ing his FCC ten­ure, Gen­achow­ski op­posed the mer­ger of AT&T and T-Mo­bile and ad­voc­ated for ex­pan­ded broad­band ac­cess across the coun­try. Gen­achow­ski spent more than a dec­ade in the private sec­tor as tech ex­ec­ut­ive and ven­ture cap­it­al­ist be­fore his ap­point­ment to head the FCC in 2009 by Pres­id­ent Obama.

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