FCC Expands Online Closed-Captioning Rules

The rules apply to video clips that have aired on TV.

National Journal
Brendan Sasso
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Brendan Sasso
July 11, 2014, 8:06 a.m.

Web­sites will soon need to of­fer closed cap­tion­ing for more videos.

In a bid to en­sure ac­cess for people who are deaf and hard-of-hear­ing, the Fed­er­al Com­mu­nic­a­tions Com­mis­sion voted un­an­im­ously Fri­day to re­quire web­sites to of­fer closed cap­tion­ing of video clips that have already aired on tele­vi­sion with cap­tions. The rules wouldn’t ap­ply to You­Tube clips or Net­flix videos that have nev­er aired on TV.

“This is just the be­gin­ning of deal­ing with our re­spons­ib­il­ity to make sure that in­di­vidu­als with spe­cial needs are at the front of the tech­no­logy train — not the back,” FCC Chair­man Tom Wheel­er said.

The 21st Cen­tury Com­mu­nic­a­tions and Video Ac­cess­ib­il­ity Act of 2010 gives the FCC au­thor­ity to re­quire closed cap­tion­ing of on­line videos. In 2012, the FCC en­acted rules that re­quired closed cap­tion­ing of full-length shows and movies that had already aired on TV, but the rules didn’t cov­er short clips.

The new re­quire­ments for clips will be­gin phas­ing in on Jan. 1, 2016, with fi­nal im­ple­ment­a­tion on Ju­ly 1, 2017. The fi­nal stage will re­quire cap­tion­ing of live events, such as news and sports.

In fil­ings to the FCC, some tech and me­dia com­pan­ies em­phas­ized that they already vol­un­tar­ily cap­tion many videos and warned that strin­gent rules could dis­cour­age some sites from up­load­ing videos in the first place.

The agency’s two Re­pub­lic­ans, Ajit Pai and Mi­chael O’Ri­elly, ex­pressed some con­cern with how the rules will af­fect small com­pan­ies and cast con­cur­ring votes.

Pai said he hopes the FCC will be “flex­ible” in en­for­cing the new rules.

“If tech­no­logy does not de­vel­op as quickly as we might like, we should ad­just ac­cord­ingly,” he said.

What We're Following See More »
DECLINES TO HEAR APPEAL
SCOTUS Leaves Political Ad Disclosure Law In Place
1 hours ago
BREAKING

The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal to the "federal disclosure rules for political advertising," leaving in place the ruling by a lower court upholding a law requiring the disclosure of donors to political ads. The appeal came from "a Denver-based libertarian think tank that wanted to run an ad without being forced to divulge its major donors," which argued that the requirement was a violation of first amendment rights under the Court's Citizens United decision.

Source:
ENLISTS THEIR HELP IN REPEAL/REPLACE
Trump Meets with Health Execs
1 hours ago
THE LATEST
WOULD CUT NON-DEFENSE BY SAME AMOUNT
Trump Budget Would Bump Defense Spending by $54 Billion
2 hours ago
THE DETAILS

"The Trump administration is proposing a budget it says will increase defense spending by $54 billion and cut non-defense spending by the same amount. The White House is sending a topline budget proposal reflecting those figures to federal agencies on Monday afternoon, according to an Office of Management and Budget official." An unnamed OMB official said most federal agencies would face cutbacks.

Source:
WILL THE DINNER HAPPEN?
Trump To Skip Correspondents Dinner
4 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Donald Trump announced in a tweet on Saturday that he would not attend the White House Correspondents' Association dinner in April. The move did not come as a surprise, another moment in his ongoing battle with the media, which he has dubbed the "enemy" of the American people and repeatedly refers to as "fake news." Multiple outlets have already cancelled their events surrounding the dinner and several are considering skipping the event outright.

FOLLOWS ARMY SECRETARY
Navy Secretary Nominee To Withdraw
5 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Phillip Bilden, Donald Trump's nominee for Navy secretary, has decided to withdraw his nomination after he was unable to sufficiently untangle his financial commitments. Bilden follows Vincent Viola, who withdrew his nomination for Army secretary.

Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login