WHERE ARE THEY NOW

Candidate Who Rode Tea-Party Wave in 2010, Then Lost in 2012, Plots Return to Congress

In this Nov,. 5, 2012 file photo, U.S. Rep. Bob Dold, R-Ill., greets commuters as he campaigns at a downtown Chicago rail station. Dold narrowly lost in the November election to Democratic businessman Brad Schneider in Illinois' 10th District. On Wednesday, May 8, 2013, Dold announced in a letter to supporters that he's decided to run for his former seat, which stretches north of Chicago to Wisconsin. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
National Journal
Cameron Smith
Add to Briefcase
Cameron Smith
Aug. 28, 2013, 3:30 p.m.

One of the most wrench­ing con­gres­sion­al races in 2012 took place in the 10th Dis­trict of Illinois, where first-term Re­pub­lic­an Rep. Robert Dold lost by a mere 1 per­cent to Demo­crat­ic chal­lenger and now-Rep. Brad Schneider.

Dold, 44, had the odds against him for a second term after re­dis­trict­ing ad­ded some heav­ily Demo­crat­ic areas and even carved his home out of the map. But as the elec­tion re­turns came in from the north Chica­go sub­urbs on Nov. 6, Dold moun­ted what looked like an in­sur­mount­able lead of thou­sands of votes.

By the end of the night, though, Schneider pulled ahead, with help from early and ab­sent­ee bal­lots that were coun­ted last, ac­cord­ing to the Daily Her­ald news­pa­pers of north­ern Illinois.

Yet just six months after the tough loss, Dold an­nounced in May that he wants a re­match with Schneider next year.

“With deep re­flec­tion, and strong sup­port from you, Dani­elle and our kids, my fam­ily, and friends,” he wrote in a let­ter to sup­port­ers, “I wanted to share with you first that I’ve made the de­cision to step for­ward and run in 2014 to rep­res­ent the 10th Dis­trict of Illinois.”

In an in­ter­view this sum­mer, Dold says it was not an easy de­cision to make an­oth­er run. “My kids are be­gin­ning to try new things,” said Dold, who has three chil­dren ages 6 to 11. “It wasn’t an ‘of course you’re gonna run’ scen­ario,” he em­phas­izes. “The de­cision was made after talks with neigh­bors, friends, and my fam­ily.”

Dold adds, “It’s not a con­veni­ent time to run. But I be­lieve it’s so im­port­ant now.” Dold was swept in­to Con­gress in the tea-party wave of 2010.

Eco­nom­ic is­sues will be at the heart of his cam­paign, prom­ises Dold, who has gone back to run­ning Rose Pest Solu­tions, Amer­ica’s old­est pest con­trol com­pany. The busi­ness has been in the fam­ily for dec­ades. Dold’s grand­fath­er and fath­er were both pres­id­ents of the Na­tion­al Pest Con­trol As­so­ci­ation, and his moth­er was pres­id­ent of the Na­tion­al Pest Man­age­ment As­so­ci­ation.

“It’s a role and re­spons­ib­il­ity I take very ser­i­ously,” he says of his pro­fes­sion­al life. “But the gov­ern­ment was mak­ing it harder for me to stick my key in the door of my busi­ness every morn­ing.”

COR­REC­TION: The head­line in an earli­er ver­sion of this story in­cor­rectly de­scribed Robert Dold as a tea-party can­did­ate.

What We're Following See More »
ANOTHER GOP MODERATE TO HER SIDE
John Warner to Endorse Clinton
6 minutes ago
THE LATEST

"Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will score another high-powered Republican endorsement on Wednesday, according to a campaign aide: retired senator John Warner of Virginia, a popular GOP maverick with renowned military credentials."

Source:
AUTHORITY OF EPA IN QUESTION
Appeals Court Hears Clean Power Plant Case
13 minutes ago
THE LATEST

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on Tuesday "heard several hours of oral arguments" over the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan rules. The 10-judge panel "focused much of their questioning on whether the EPA had overstepped its legal authority by seeking to broadly compel this shift away from coal, a move the EPA calls the Best System of Emission Reduction, or BSER. The states and companies suing the EPA argue the agency doesn’t have the authority to regulate anything outside of a power plant itself."

Source:
$28 MILLION THIS WEEK
Here Come the Ad Buys
25 minutes ago
THE LATEST

"Spending by super PACs tied to Donald Trump friends such as Ben Carson and banker Andy Beal will help make this week the general election's most expensive yet. Republicans and Democrats will spend almost $28 million on radio and television this week, according to advertising records, as Trump substantially increases his advertising buy for the final stretch. He's spending $6.4 million in nine states, part of what aides have said will be a $100 million television campaign through Election Day."

Source:
UNLIKELY TO GET A VOTE, LIKELY TO ANGER GOP SENATORS
Obama Nominates Ambassador to Cuba
4 hours ago
THE LATEST
GOP REFUSED VOTE ON FCC COMMISIONER
Reid Blocks Tech Bill Over “Broken Promise”
4 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Monday night's debate may have inspired some in Congress, as Senate Minority Leader has decided to take a stand of his own. Reid is declining to allow a vote on a "bipartisan bill that would bolster U.S. spectrum availability and the deployment of wireless broadband." Why? Because of a "broken promise" made a year ago by Republicans, who have refused to vote on confirmation for a Democratic commissioner on the Federal Communications Commission to a second term. Harry Reid then took it a step further, invoking another confirmation vote still outstanding, that of Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland.

Source:
×