End of the Road for FERC Nominee?

Rep.-elect Tim Scott, R-S.C.., speaks during news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010. (AP Photo/Harry Hamburg)  
National Journal
Alex Brown
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Alex Brown
Sept. 26, 2013, 7:19 a.m.

Bar­ring some un­usu­al man­euv­er­ing by Sen­ate Ma­jor­ity Lead­er Harry Re­id, Ron Binz’s chances of head­ing the Fed­er­al En­ergy Reg­u­lat­ory Com­mis­sion may be all but gone.

Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., an­nounced his op­pos­i­tion to Binz on Thursday morn­ing, mean­ing all 10 Re­pub­lic­ans on the Sen­ate’s En­ergy and Nat­ur­al Re­sources Com­mit­tee—along with Demo­crat­ic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Vir­gin­ia—re­portedly stand against his con­firm­a­tion. That means the 22-mem­ber pan­el will not be able to re­com­mend him for a full Sen­ate vote.

A spokes­man for com­mit­tee chair­man Ron Wyden, D-Ore., signaled the White House may be mov­ing in a new dir­ec­tion. “The com­mit­tee is aware that oth­er can­did­ates are be­ing con­sidered to lead the FERC,” Keith Chu said.

Binz’s con­firm­a­tion pro­spects had been tenu­ous fol­low­ing a gruel­ing hear­ing be­fore the com­mit­tee earli­er this month. Manchin and Sen. Rob Port­man, R-Ohio, have said Binz re­vealed a bi­as to­ward re­new­able fuels over coal dur­ing his time as head of the Col­or­ado reg­u­lat­ory au­thor­ity, but Binz has denied he is anti-coal.

Spec­u­la­tion in­tens­i­fied Wed­nes­day when Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., said she had heard Binz was with­draw­ing his name. Not so, ac­cord­ing to the com­mis­sion. “Mr. Binz has not with­drawn his nom­in­a­tion,” said FERC spokes­wo­man Mary O’Driscoll.

Al­though Binz may not be able to earn the com­mit­tee’s ma­jor­ity sup­port, a spokes­man for Wyden said the pan­el would still hold a vote on re­com­mend­ing him to the full Sen­ate.

What re­mains to be seen is if Re­id will put Binz’s con­firm­a­tion be­fore the full Sen­ate without the com­mit­tee’s ap­prov­al, a move pre­vi­ous ma­jor­ity lead­ers have used in rare in­stances for stalled nom­in­ees. In 2005, the nom­in­a­tion of former Am­bas­sad­or to the United Na­tions John Bolton was sent to a vote be­fore the Sen­ate without the back­ing of the Sen­ate For­eign Re­la­tions Com­mit­tee. Re­id has not stated wheth­er he will use such a man­euver, but he did push the White House to nom­in­ate Binz over the ori­gin­al choice, John Nor­ris. 

Ac­cord­ing to Sen­ate data, only five nom­in­a­tions that got a neut­ral re­port­ing from a com­mit­tee have been brought to the floor since 1987, and only one was ap­proved. Sim­il­arly, only five neg­at­ive re­ports on nom­in­ees were sent to the Sen­ate floor, and just one was ap­proved.

What We're Following See More »
ON THE CALL: “AT LEAST THAT WAS SACRED”
Gen. Kelly Rips Rep. Wilson for Criticism
2 hours ago
THE LATEST
GOP FORMER PRES V. GOP CURRENT PRES
Bush Slams Trump, Implicitly
2 hours ago
THE DETAILS
AMENDMENT WOULD HAVE PREVENTED CONSIDERATION
Senate Rejects Effort to Nix SALT Tax Changes
3 hours ago
THE LATEST

"Senate Democrats on Thursday failed in their first attempt to save the state and local tax deduction, which helps many residents of California and other high-cost states reduce their federal income tax bills. The Republican-controlled Senate voted 52-47 to reject an amendment that would have prevented the Senate from considering any bill that repeals or limits the deduction as part of a planned tax overhaul."

Source:
MEETING WITH SENATE GOP
Trump to Hill Next Tuesday
4 hours ago
THE DETAILS
INTERPARTY FEUDING CONTINUES UNDER PEREZ
Longtime Progressive Members Pushed Out at DNC
5 hours ago
THE LATEST

"A shake-up is underway at the Democratic National Committee as several key longtime officials have lost their posts, exposing a still-raw rift in the party and igniting anger among those in its progressive wing who see retaliation for their opposition to DNC Chairman Tom Perez. The ousters come ahead of the DNC's first meeting, in Las Vegas, Nevada, since Perez took over as chairman with a pledge this year to unite a party that had become badly divided during the brutal Bernie Sanders-Hillary Clinton 2016 primary race."

Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login