Poll: Majority Sides With GOP on Debt-Ceiling Hike

Sixty-one percent say the debt ceiling should be leveraged in exchange for spending cuts, even if that puts the country at risk of default.

Boehner: Speaking at Economic Club.
National Journal
Patrick Reis
Sept. 26, 2013, 7:25 a.m.

More than six in 10 Amer­ic­ans say Con­gress should re­quire spend­ing cuts be­fore rais­ing the debt ceil­ing, even if that puts the na­tion at risk of de­fault, ac­cord­ing to a Bloomberg poll re­leased Thursday.

Pres­id­ent Obama and con­gres­sion­al Demo­crats are de­mand­ing a debt-ceil­ing in­crease with no con­di­tions, with the pres­id­ent re­peatedly ad­mon­ish­ing Con­gress to “pay the bills that they’ve already racked up.” The busi­ness com­munity — wary of the eco­nom­ic con­sequences of de­fault — is call­ing on Con­gress to raise the lim­it as well.

But those ar­gu­ments ap­pear to have failed to win over a ma­jor­ity of the pub­lic thus far, with only 28 per­cent of re­spond­ents telling Bloomberg they fa­vor an un­con­di­tion­al in­crease. El­ev­en per­cent said they were un­sure.

Rais­ing the debt ceil­ing does not au­thor­ize any new con­gres­sion­al spend­ing. In­stead, it au­thor­izes the Treas­ury De­part­ment to bor­row more to pay the coun­try’s ex­ist­ing ob­lig­a­tions.

By with­hold­ing an in­crease, however, Re­pub­lic­ans see a win­dow to force spend­ing cuts, a man­euver they suc­cess­fully em­ployed in 2011, when they agreed to raise the debt ceil­ing only after Demo­crats agreed to put in place a spend­ing-re­duc­tion plan that even­tu­ally pro­duced the cur­rent across-the-board dis­cre­tion­ary spend­ing cuts known as the se­quester.

The non­par­tis­an Con­gres­sion­al Budget Of­fice says the de­fi­cit is fall­ing sharply when meas­ured as a per­cent­age of the coun­try’s total eco­nom­ic out­put, but the ma­jor­ity of Amer­ic­ans see it dif­fer­ently. Fifty-nine per­cent of poll re­spond­ents said the de­fi­cit is grow­ing, 26 per­cent said it was hold­ing steady, and only 10 per­cent said it is get­ting smal­ler.

Bloomberg’s poll was done via in­ter­views of 1,000 U.S. adults con­duc­ted between Sept. 20 and Sept. 23.

What We're Following See More »
A DARK CLOUD OVER TRUMP?
Snowstorm Could Impact Primary Turnout
2 days ago
THE LATEST

A snowstorm is supposed to hit New Hampshire today and “linger into Primary Tuesday.” GOP consultant Ron Kaufman said lower turnout should help candidates who have spent a lot of time in the state tending to retail politicking. Donald Trump “has acknowledged that he needs to step up his ground-game, and a heavy snowfall could depress his figures relative to more organized candidates.”

Source:
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
A Shake-Up in the Offing in the Clinton Camp?
2 days ago
THE DETAILS

Anticipating a primary loss in New Hampshire on Tuesday, Hillary and Bill Clinton “are considering staffing and strategy changes” to their campaign. Sources tell Politico that the Clintons are likely to layer over top officials with experienced talent, rather than fire their staff en masse.

Source:
THE LAST ROUND OF NEW HAMPSHIRE POLLS
Trump Is Still Ahead, but Who’s in Second?
1 days ago
THE LATEST

We may not be talking about New Hampshire primary polls for another three-and-a-half years, so here goes:

  • American Research Group’s tracking poll has Donald Trump in the lead with 30% support, followed by Marco Rubio and John Kasich tying for second place at 16%. On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders leads Hillary Clinton 53%-41%.
  • The 7 News/UMass Lowell tracking poll has Trump way out front with 34%, followed by Rubio and Ted Cruz with 13% apiece. Among the Democrats, Sanders is in front 56%-40%.
  • A Gravis poll puts Trump ahead with 28%, followed by Kasich with 17% and Rubio with 15%.
IT’S ALL ABOUT SECOND PLACE
CNN Calls the Primary for Sanders and Trump
1 days ago
THE LATEST

Well that didn’t take long. CNN has already declared Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump the winners of the New Hampshire primary, leaving the rest of the candidates to fight for the scraps. Five minutes later, the Associated Press echoed CNN’s call.

Source:
×