A LOOK AHEAD

Global Security Newswire Staff
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Global Security Newswire Staff
Sept. 27, 2013, 7:02 a.m.

What’s next on non­pro­lif­er­a­tion and in­ter­na­tion­al se­cur­ity, in Wash­ing­ton and around the globe.

— Sept. 30: Deputy De­fense Sec­ret­ary Ashton Carter will be all about In­dia — at least for an hour. He’s sched­uled to dish about U.S.-In­dia mil­it­ary co­oper­a­tion and de­fense trade at the Cen­ter for Amer­ic­an Pro­gress, a Wash­ing­ton think tank with strong ties to Pres­id­ent Obama. Carter has been steer­ing the Pentagon’s ef­forts to se­cure a stronger mil­it­ary part­ner­ship with the na­tion that has both a boom­ing eco­nomy and his­tory of nuc­le­ar-weapons test­ing. His talk is timely, as Pres­id­ent Obama and In­di­an Prime Min­is­ter Man­mo­han Singh were slated to meet at the White House on Sept. 27.

— Sept. 30: An­oth­er high-pro­file Ashton — Cath­er­ine Ashton, high rep­res­ent­at­ive of the European Uni­on for for­eign af­fairs and se­cur­ity policy and vice pres­id­ent of the European Com­mis­sion — is poised to ad­dress the Wilson Cen­ter in Wash­ing­ton. Ashton has been a key fig­ure in set­ting up po­ten­tial multi-na­tion talks with Ir­an about its nuc­le­ar-de­vel­op­ment ef­forts — which the Middle East­ern na­tion in­sists are peace­ful in nature, yet West­ern powers fear are aimed at de­vel­op­ing atom­ic weapons. The think tank says Ashton will delve in­to is­sues the U.N. Gen­er­al As­sembly re­cently ad­dressed — namely Ir­an and Syr­ia ““ as well as her work re­lated to the Balkans, Egypt and Somalia. The Wilson Cen­ter, un­der the lead­er­ship of former Demo­crat­ic con­gress­wo­man Jane Har­man, is us­ing the event to make the start of a new Glob­al Europe pro­gram that, is says, fo­cuses on “Europe’s ex­tern­al chal­lenges and op­por­tun­it­ies.”

— Sept. 30: Can the United States and Rus­sia move past mu­tu­al nuc­le­ar de­terrence? The Brook­ings In­sti­tu­tion’s Arms Con­trol Ini­ti­at­ive is team­ing up with Har­vard’s Belfer Cen­ter for Sci­ence and In­ter­na­tion­al Af­fairs for an event (at the Wash­ing­ton think tank’s of­fice) that will tackle this and re­lated, thorny is­sues re­gard­ing post-Cold War U.S.-Rus­si­an re­la­tions. A trio of pan­el­ists — Gary Sam­ore, ex­ec­ut­ive dir­ect­or for Re­search at the Belfer Cen­ter, Wil­li­am To­bey, seni­or fel­low at the Belfer Cen­ter, and Pavel Zo­lotar­ev, deputy dir­ect­or of the In­sti­tute for U.S. and Ca­na­dian Stud­ies at the Rus­si­an Academy of Sci­ences, or ISKRAN — will chat about a new re­port they wrote, dubbed “Tran­scend­ing Mu­tu­al De­terrence in the U.S.-Rus­si­an Re­la­tion­ship.”

— Sept. 30-Oct. 1: The much-talked-about U.N. Gen­er­al As­sembly will wrap up its work, but not be­fore hear­ing from Is­raeli Prime Min­is­ter Ben­jamin Net­an­yahu, who is slated to be the fi­nal speak­er at the yearly gath­er­ing of coun­tries. His speech — which will be web­cast — is ex­pec­ted to in­clude a re­peated call for Ir­an to cease its urani­um-en­rich­ment activ­it­ies. All eyes have been on the U.N. Se­cur­ity Coun­cil, which on Sept. 26 agreed on a res­ol­u­tion re­quir­ing Syr­ia to elim­in­ate its chem­ic­al weapons. The deal, not­ably, does not in­clude im­me­di­ate pen­al­ties (such as U.S. mil­it­ary strikes) if Pres­id­ent Bashar As­sad does not com­ply. In re­cent days the United Na­tions and the Or­gan­iz­a­tion for the Pro­hib­i­tion of Chem­ic­al Weapons were hash­ing out how to de­lin­eate their roles in in­spect­ing and ul­ti­mately elim­in­at­ing Syr­ia’s newly de­clared chem­ic­al arms.

— Sept. 30-Oct. 1: Dis­arm­a­ment ex­perts from Europe and bey­ond will gath­er at the second EU Non-pro­lif­er­a­tion and Dis­arm­a­ment Con­fer­ence in Brus­sels. Top­ics for the three plen­ary ses­sions will be “strength­en­ing the non-pro­lif­er­a­tion and dis­arm­a­ment re­gime,” “ad­dress­ing non-pro­lif­er­a­tion and dis­arm­a­ment in the Middle East” and “EU non-pro­lif­er­a­tion policy and im­ple­ment­a­tion.” The gath­er­ing — ar­ranged by the EU Non-pro­lif­er­a­tion Con­sor­ti­um and the In­ter­na­tion­al In­sti­tute for Stra­tegic Stud­ies — is sure to touch on a stalled U.N. ef­fort to con­vene a con­fer­ence about des­ig­nat­ing the Middle East as a weapons-of-mass-de­struc­tion-free zone.

Oct. 1: Waste Con­fid­ence. The Nuc­le­ar Reg­u­lat­ory Com­mis­sion plans to meet in Rock­ville, Md., to dis­cuss and hear from the pub­lic about its pro­posed changes to its reg­u­la­tions re­lated to the en­vir­on­ment­al im­pacts of in­def­in­itely stor­ing spent nuc­le­ar fuel at nuc­le­ar-power plants. So-called waste con­fid­ence has been a con­tro­ver­sial top­ic. The NRC says the meet­ing will “provide an op­por­tun­ity for in­ter­ested parties to provide com­ments on the Waste Con­fid­ence Draft Gen­er­ic En­vir­on­ment­al Im­pact  State­ment (DGEIS) and pro­posed rule,” start­ing with a “brief” staff present­a­tion be­fore a pub­lic-com­ment peri­od.

Oct. 2: Nine ex­perts will gath­er to dis­cuss the book “Stra­tegic Asia 2013-14: Asia in the Second Nuc­le­ar Age” at George Wash­ing­ton Uni­versity in the na­tion’s cap­it­al. The tome “ex­am­ines the role of nuc­le­ar weapons in the grand strategies of key Asi­an states and as­sesses the im­pact of these cap­ab­il­it­ies — both es­tab­lished and lat­ent — on re­gion­al and in­ter­na­tion­al sta­bil­ity,” ac­cord­ing to The Na­tion­al Bur­eau of Asi­an Re­search. The 13th an­nu­al volume of the book re­flects up­dated as­sess­ments of eco­nom­ic, polit­ic­al and mil­it­ary trends. The chapters, writ­ten by var­ied ex­perts, tackle top­ics such as Ir­an’s nuc­le­ar am­bi­tions.

Oct. 4: Har­vard Yard will be the loc­a­tion of the sem­in­ar “Steps to Pre­vent Nuc­le­ar Ter­ror­ism: Re­com­mend­a­tions Based on the U.S.-Rus­sia Joint Threat As­sess­ment.” The event, at Har­vard Uni­versity’s John F. Kennedy School of Gov­ern­ment in Cam­bridge, Mass., will look at a new re­port from the Belfer Cen­ter and ISKRAN. The two or­gan­iz­a­tions pub­lished the “U.S.-Rus­sia Joint Threat As­sess­ment on Nuc­le­ar Ter­ror­ism” in 2011. Their new re­port, to be presen­ted at this sem­in­ar, “ana­lyzes the ex­ist­ing frame­work for ac­tion, iden­ti­fies gaps and de­fi­cien­cies, and makes spe­cif­ic re­com­mend­a­tions for im­prove­ment of nuc­le­ar se­cur­ity,” or­gan­izers say.

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