Women See GOP Drifting Further From Them

United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll finds just 14 percent of women think the GOP is now closer to representing their views.

A woman casts her ballot for the US presidential election at an early voting center in Columbus, Ohio, on October 15, 2012. Three weeks before election day, the White House race between US president Barack Obama and his Republican foe Mitt Romney remains statistically tied, with Obama maintaining just a slight advantage, a new opinion poll found Monday. 
National Journal
Shane Goldmacher
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Shane Goldmacher
Oct. 2, 2013, 6:22 p.m.

The Re­pub­lic­an Party’s ef­fort to rebrand it­self with wo­men since los­ing the 2012 pres­id­en­tial race and seats in Con­gress is fall­ing short, a new United Tech­no­lo­gies/Na­tion­al Journ­al Con­gres­sion­al Con­nec­tion Poll has found.

Only 14 per­cent of wo­men said the Re­pub­lic­an Party had moved closer to their per­spect­ive. More than twice as many wo­men, 33 per­cent, said the party had drif­ted fur­ther from them. A plur­al­ity, 46 per­cent, saw no change.

The dangers for the GOP of los­ing wo­men’s sup­port are play­ing out in the Vir­gin­ia gubernat­ori­al race, where Demo­crat­ic nom­in­ee Terry McAul­iffe has taken the lead over Re­pub­lic­an At­tor­ney Gen­er­al Ken Cuc­cinelli, al­most en­tirely by open­ing up a lead among fe­male voters.

In the new poll, the res­ults for the GOP are even more omin­ous among young wo­men. Only 11 per­cent of wo­men young­er than 50 said the party had moved closer to them. In con­trast, 29 per­cent said the GOP had moved fur­ther away.

Col­lege-edu­cated white wo­men were par­tic­u­larly likely (45 per­cent) to say the Re­pub­lic­an Party was now fur­ther from their views. That is es­pe­cially sig­ni­fic­ant be­cause Re­pub­lic­ans had made crit­ic­al gains among that demo­graph­ic in the 2012 elec­tion cycle. Pres­id­ent Obama’s sup­port among col­lege-edu­cated white wo­men dropped by 6 per­cent­age points, from 52 per­cent to 46 per­cent, between the 2008 and 2012 elec­tions, ac­cord­ing to na­tion­al exit polls.

Of those wo­men who said the Re­pub­lic­an Party had moved away from them, nearly three in five, 59 per­cent, said it was be­cause the GOP had be­come “too con­ser­vat­ive.” Only 33 per­cent said the party was fur­ther from them be­cause it wasn’t con­ser­vat­ive enough.

Again, the res­ults were par­tic­u­larly sharp for col­lege-edu­cated white wo­men — the type of sub­urb­an voters that cam­paigns typ­ic­ally vie heav­ily to win. Of those col­lege-edu­cated white wo­men who said the Re­pub­lic­an Party has moved fur­ther from them, 66 per­cent said it was be­cause it had be­come “too con­ser­vat­ive.”

The United Tech­no­lo­gies/Na­tion­al Journ­al Con­gres­sion­al Con­nec­tion Poll, con­duc­ted by Prin­ceton Sur­vey Re­search As­so­ci­ates In­ter­na­tion­al, in­ter­viewed 1,005 adults between Sept. 25 and 29, via land­line and cell phone. The over­all mar­gin of er­ror is 3.7 per­cent­age points, but sub­groups have great­er mar­gins of er­ror.

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