Iran Talks Finish First Day Amid Signals of Optimism

Global Security Newswire Staff
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Global Security Newswire Staff
Oct. 15, 2013, 11:02 a.m.

Ir­an and six key gov­ern­ments signaled early op­tim­ism on the first day of a closely watched nuc­le­ar meet­ing on Tues­day, the state-run Fars News Agency re­por­ted.

Ir­a­ni­an For­eign Min­is­ter Mo­hammad Javad Za­rif opened the two-day dis­cus­sion in Geneva with a slideshow brief­ing thought to de­tail a pro­posed timeline for trust-boost­ing steps over its dis­puted nuc­le­ar activ­it­ies, the Lon­don Guard­i­an re­por­ted. The sides are seek­ing to re­solve in­ter­na­tion­al fears that secret nuc­le­ar-bomb am­bi­tions are guid­ing Ir­an’s nuc­le­ar pro­gram; Tehran in­sists the atom­ic ef­fort is non­mil­it­ary in nature.

“There is a pos­it­ive at­mo­sphere. … The first re­ac­tions were good,” Re­u­ters quoted Ir­a­ni­an Deputy For­eign Min­is­ter Ab­bas as say­ing after Za­rif’s morn­ing dis­cus­sion.

Un­dis­closed de­tails from the for­eign min­is­ter’s talk — titled “Clos­ing an un­ne­ces­sary crisis: Open­ing new ho­ri­zons” — could in­clude pro­pos­als to re­strict cer­tain Ir­a­ni­an nuc­le­ar activ­it­ies, ac­cord­ing to the Guard­i­an. In re­turn, Tehran would likely ex­pect the five per­man­ent U.N. Se­cur­ity Coun­cil mem­ber na­tions and Ger­many to curb in­ter­na­tion­al eco­nom­ic pen­al­ties and af­firm the Per­sian Gulf power’s right to en­rich urani­um, the news­pa­per said.

A spokes­man for European Uni­on for­eign policy chief Cath­er­ine Ashton said Za­rif’s dis­cus­sion was “very use­ful.”

The top Ir­a­ni­an dip­lo­mat met one-on-one with Ashton after mul­ti­lat­er­al talks ended for the day, Fars News re­por­ted. Ashton has com­mu­nic­ated with Ir­an on be­half of the six oth­er ne­go­ti­at­ing powers: China, France, Ger­many, Rus­sia, the United King­dom and the United States.

What We're Following See More »
FBI TURNED DOWN REQUEST
Report: Trump Asked FBI to Deny Russia Stories
2 days ago
THE LATEST

"The FBI rejected a recent White House request to publicly knock down media reports about communications between Donald Trump's associates and Russians known to US intelligence during the 2016 presidential campaign, multiple US officials briefed on the matter tell CNN. But a White House official said late Thursday that the request was only made after the FBI indicated to the White House it did not believe the reporting to be accurate."

Source:
THE QUESTION
How Many Signatures Has the Petition for Trump’s Tax Returns Received?
3 days ago
THE ANSWER

More than 1 million, setting a record. More than 100,000 signatures triggers an official White House response.

Source:
TIED TO RUSSIA INVESTIGATION
Sen. Collins Open to Subpoena of Trump’s Tax Returns
3 days ago
THE LATEST

Sen. Susan Collins, who sits on the Intelligence Committee, "said on Wednesday she's open to using a subpoena to investigate President Donald Trump's tax returns for potential connections to Russia." She said the committee is also open to subpoenaing Trump himself. "This is a counter-intelligence operation in many ways," she said of Russia's interference. "That's what our committee specializes in. We are used to probing in depth in this area."

Source:
NPR ALSO LAUNCHES ETHICS WATCH
Obama Staffers Launch Group to Monitor Trump Ethics
3 days ago
WHY WE CARE

"Top lawyers who helped the Obama White House craft and hold to rules of conduct believe President Donald Trump and his staff will break ethics norms meant to guard against politicization of the government — and they’ve formed a new group to prepare, and fight. United to Protect Democracy, which draws its name from a line in President Barack Obama’s farewell address that urged his supporters to pick up where he was leaving off, has already raised a $1.5 million operating budget, hired five staffers and has plans to double that in the coming months." Meanwhile, NPR has launched a "Trump Ethics Monitor" to track the resolution of ten ethics-related promises that the president has made.

Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login