The 30 House Republicans Who Help Break the ‘Hastert Rule’

From eight members in districts Obama won to one in a top-ten GOP-leaning seat.

The early morning sun begins to rise behind the U.S. Capitol on December 17, 2010 in Washington, DC.
National Journal
Scott Bland
Add to Briefcase
Scott Bland
Oct. 18, 2013, 10:09 a.m.

The House of Rep­res­ent­at­ives’ Re­pub­lic­an ma­jor­ity is in charge of what comes to a vote in that cham­ber, and typ­ic­ally the only bills that come up are sup­por­ted by a ma­jor­ity of the ma­jor­ity. But House Speak­er John Boehner has ig­nored that rule on three oc­ca­sions in­volving must-pass le­gis­la­tion this Con­gress, and there are 30 Re­pub­lic­ans who voted with nearly every House Demo­crat to pass each of those bills: one end­ing the gov­ern­ment shut­down and rais­ing the debt ceil­ing, one reau­thor­iz­ing the Vi­ol­ence Against Wo­men Act, and one provid­ing fund­ing for Su­per­storm Sandy re­lief.

As I wrote in today’s Na­tion­al Journ­al Daily, this “gov­ern­ing caucus” of Re­pub­lic­ans would likely play a key role in any fu­ture ma­jor le­gis­la­tion in this Con­gress. (An­oth­er 44 Re­pub­lic­ans voted for two of the three bills in ques­tion.) But there are sev­er­al ser­i­ous bar­ri­ers in their path, as in­dic­ated by the fact that they have only got­ten to ex­er­cise their power three times in nine months. Here are the 30 Re­pub­lic­an law­makers who have split with their party on these key votes:

Rep. Spen­cer Bachus, R-Ala.
Rep. Lou Bar­letta, R-Pa.
Rep. Charles Bous­tany, R-La.
Rep. Shel­ley Moore Capito, R-W.Va.
Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla.
Rep. Kev­in Cramer, R-N.D.
Rep. Rod­ney Dav­is, R-Ill.
Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa.
Rep. Mario Diaz-Bal­art, R-Fla.
Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick, R-Pa.
Rep. Rod­ney Frel­inghuysen, R-N.J.
Rep. Jim Ger­lach, R-Pa.
Rep. Chris Gib­son, R-N.Y.
Rep. Mi­chael Grimm, R-N.Y.
Rep. Richard Hanna, R-N.Y.
Rep. Gregg Harp­er, R-Miss.
Rep. Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, R-Wash.
Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y.
Rep. Le­onard Lance, R-N.J.
Rep. Frank Lo­Bi­ondo, R-N.J.
Rep. Kev­in Mc­Carthy, R-Cal­if.
Rep. Buck McK­eon, R-Cal­if.
Rep. Dav­id McKin­ley, R-W.Va.
Rep. Patrick Mee­han, R-Pa.
Rep. Dave Reich­ert, R-Wash.
Rep. Ileana Ros-Le­htin­en, R-Fla.
Rep. Jon Run­yan, R-N.J.
Rep. John Shimkus, R-Ill.
Rep. Dav­id Valadao, R-Cal­if.
Rep. Todd Young, R-Ind.

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