Government Shutdown Fuels House Democratic Fundraising

The Democrats’ House campaign arm raised a record amount of money for September in a non-election year.

Money Roll
National Journal
Alex Roarty
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Alex Roarty
Oct. 21, 2013, 3:17 a.m.

Demo­crats are already be­ne­fit­ing polit­ic­ally from the gov­ern­ment shut­down — in their pock­et­books.

The Demo­crat­ic Con­gres­sion­al Cam­paign Com­mit­tee raised $8.4 mil­lion in Septem­ber, ac­cord­ing to an aide with the group, a sig­ni­fic­ant sum more than a year be­fore next year’s elec­tion. The haul dwarfs the $5.3 mil­lion col­lec­ted last month by the Na­tion­al Re­pub­lic­an Con­gres­sion­al Com­mit­tee, which was again out-raised by House Demo­crats des­pite hold­ing the ma­jor­ity.

To date this year, the DCCC has raised $58.2 mil­lion and has $21.6 mil­lion on hand. The NR­CC has $15.7 mil­lion cash on hand.

The run-up to the 16-day stan­doff, which began Oct. 1, had a big im­pact on the DCCC’s Septem­ber fin­ances. In the six days after Sen. Ted Cruz’s fili­buster, it raised $2 mil­lion on­line on nearly 100,000 dona­tions, ac­cord­ing to a com­mit­tee aide. In total last month, the group col­lec­ted $3 mil­lion from 160,000 on­line dona­tions, help­ing push it to the best off-year Septem­ber fun­drais­ing haul in the DCCC’s his­tory.

The re­port is the latest sign that after the shut­down, money is be­com­ing a con­cern for Re­pub­lic­ans. Dis­sat­is­fied donors from the GOP’s busi­ness and con­ser­vat­ive wings, angry at a party they don’t think is listen­ing to them, have threatened to with­hold con­tri­bu­tions. Demo­crats have also out­raised Re­pub­lic­ans else­where: The Demo­crat­ic Sen­at­ori­al Cam­paign Com­mit­tee raised $4.6 mil­lion last month, $1 mil­lion more than the Na­tion­al Re­pub­lic­an Sen­at­ori­al Com­mit­tee’s $3.6 mil­lion. For the first time in 17 months, the Demo­crat­ic Na­tion­al Com­mit­tee raised more cash than the Re­pub­lic­an Na­tion­al Com­mit­tee — $7.4 mil­lion to $7.1 mil­lion.

And the surge oc­curred en­tirely be­fore the gov­ern­ment shut­down took ef­fect, sug­gest­ing the fun­drais­ing dis­par­ity could widen after Oc­to­ber’s re­ports are re­leased next month.

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