Experts Assess Syrian Hackers’ Capabilities

Emelie Rutherford, Global Security Newswire
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Emelie Rutherford, Global Security Newswire
Oct. 23, 2013, 11:02 a.m.

WASH­ING­TON — A Syr­i­an hack­ing group’s re­por­ted de­fa­cing of Qatari gov­ern­ment webpages over the week­end could sig­nal a new dir­ec­tion for the or­gan­iz­a­tion that has in­filt­rated West­ern news web­sites and is loy­al to Bashar As­sad, the civil-war-torn coun­try’s em­battled pres­id­ent.

Still, U.S. cy­ber­se­cur­ity ex­perts said they don’t ex­pect the so-called Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army to take steps as drastic as com­prom­ising U.S. nuc­le­ar fa­cil­it­ies or crip­pling the crit­ic­al in­fra­struc­ture of a ma­jor world power through a cy­ber at­tack — at least not in the near fu­ture, and not without help from oth­er coun­tries.

The Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army is loy­al to As­sad, though U.S. ana­lysts say its spe­cif­ic ties to the re­gime are not clear. The group in re­cent months has tar­geted news and com­mu­nic­a­tions web­sites in and out of the United States, with sus­pec­ted ac­tions in­clud­ing dis­abling the New York Times’ page in Au­gust and post­ing pro-As­sad mes­sages on a U.S. Mar­ines Corps page in Septem­ber. It in­fam­ously caused U.S. stock mar­kets to dip in April after post­ing a fake news alert about a White House bomb­ing on the As­so­ci­ated Press’ Twit­ter page.

This past Sunday, Qatari of­fi­cials said they re­covered gov­ern­ment web­sites tar­geted by the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army, in­clud­ing the Qatari in­teri­or min­istry’s site, ac­cord­ing to Middle East­ern news re­ports.

“It’s pretty in­ter­est­ing that (the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army) went to Qatar,” said Chris­toph­er Ahl­berg, CEO and cofounder of Re­cor­ded Fu­ture in Cam­bridge, Mass., a com­pany that tracks com­puter in­filt­ra­tions around the world. The Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army re­portedly said it tar­geted Qatar be­cause it sup­ports Syr­i­an rebels. In an in­ter­view with Glob­al Se­cur­ity News­wire, Ahl­berg also poin­ted to an­oth­er pos­sible mo­tiv­a­tion: “Maybe it’s be­cause the at­tract­ive tar­gets in the U.S. and the U.K. are now locked down now, so they have to go else­where.”

If that is the case, more coun­tries could be sub­ject to the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army’s tac­tics, which are de­scribed in re­cent re­ports by net­work-se­cur­ity com­pany Fire Eye, in­ter­net-con­tent-de­liv­ery firm Akamai and Wash­ing­ton think tank the Cen­ter for Stra­tegic and In­ter­na­tion­al Stud­ies. Those ac­tions in­clude web­site de­fa­cings, deni­al-of-ser­vice at­tacks, “phish­ing” cam­paigns to trick com­puter users to re­veal pass­words and sens­it­ive codes, and e-mail spam­ming of gov­ern­ments, me­dia out­lets and on­line ser­vices.

Pre­vi­ously, the Syr­i­an hack­ing group had been tied to some at­tacks of gov­ern­ment web­sites — in­clud­ing a re­portedly failed at­tempt to dis­rupt the wa­ter sup­ply in the Is­raeli city of Haifa and a po­ten­tially suc­cess­ful breach of the Saudi Ar­a­bi­an Min­istry of De­fense email sys­tem, both in May. However, the valid­ity of those re­ports has been ques­tioned, ac­cord­ing to U.S. ana­lysts. Akamai’s Oct. 16 re­port also says the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army “has been as­so­ci­ated with the post­ing of pro-Syr­i­an pro­pa­ganda” to the Face­book pages of the U.S. Em­bassy in Dam­as­cus, U.S. De­part­ment of State, U.S. De­part­ment of Treas­ury, the White House and Pres­id­ent Obama.

The U.S. Na­tion­al Se­cur­ity Agency is be­lieved to be in­vest­ig­at­ing the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army, by ac­cess­ing some mem­bers’ com­puters and net­works to un­der­stand if they have the cap­ab­il­ity to launch a lar­ger at­tack, ac­cord­ing to Mat­thew Rhoades, the dir­ect­or of the Cy­ber­space & Se­cur­ity Pro­gram at the Cen­ter for Na­tion­al Policy & Tru­man Na­tion­al Se­cur­ity Pro­ject in Wash­ing­ton. A worst-case scen­ario could be a cata­stroph­ic cy­ber at­tack on U.S. crit­ic­al in­fra­struc­ture, in­clud­ing nuc­le­ar re­act­ors.

Rhoades, though, in an in­ter­view with GSN said he doesn’t “know that there is a cap­ab­il­ity or an in­tent with­in these Syr­i­an groups as of today to pur­sue and suc­cess­fully com­plete one of those at­tacks.”

“As far as cap­ab­il­it­ies, they’re con­sidered to be on the lower end of the spec­trum,” he said. “They’re mo­tiv­ated by polit­ic­al reas­ons right now. So that’s why they go after me­dia out­lets. That’s why they go after some gov­ern­ment or­gan­iz­a­tions. That’s why they go after anti-As­sad groups. They do not ap­pre­ci­ate the cov­er­age … [of the] sort of pro-West, anti-As­sad news me­dia.”

Ahl­berg said the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army is “not the most soph­ist­ic­ated” group of hack­ers, when com­pared to their coun­ter­parts in Rus­sia, who have tar­geted for­eign banks, and in China, who have sought mil­it­ary secrets.

It is un­clear if the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army has con­nec­tions to more-ad­vanced hack­ing groups from oth­er na­tions that are crit­ic­al of U.S. policy, Rhoades said.

“Ir­an and Rus­sia would worry me the most, and for two sep­ar­ate reas­ons,” he said. “Rus­sia, be­cause they’re highly soph­ist­ic­ated, and so if there’s some sort of edu­ca­tion­al com­pon­ent between the two, that could greatly ex­pand Syr­i­an cap­ab­il­it­ies. … (And) If any­body was mo­tiv­ated to do something on the cy­ber-at­tack side of the scale, from a na­tion-state per­spect­ive, you would ima­gine it would be Ir­an.”

While U.S.-Ir­a­ni­an re­la­tions are im­prov­ing, Rhoades noted they still are tenu­ous.

Ken­neth Geers, a seni­or glob­al threat ana­lyst for Mil­pitas, Cal­if.-based Fir­eEye, said the United States “ab­so­lutely” should be con­cerned about Rus­si­an and Ir­a­ni­an hack­ers train­ing and aid­ing the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army.

“Cy­ber­space is a re­flec­tion of tra­di­tion­al so­cial, polit­ic­al, and mil­it­ary af­fairs,” he said in an emailed re­sponse to ques­tions. “Rus­sia and Ir­an are Syr­ia’s al­lies in tra­di­tion­al space, so they are Syr­ia’s al­lies in cy­ber­space.”

Geers, whose past gov­ern­ment roles in­clude stints at the Na­tion­al Se­cur­ity Agency and NATO, said he be­lieves two factors sug­gest the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army pos­sesses an “ad­vanced per­sist­ent threat,” which he defines as hav­ing the dir­ect or in­dir­ect sup­port of a na­tion state: “First, the dur­a­tion of SEA’s at­tacks: over two years; second, their grav­ity: with­in a week in Ju­ly 2013, SEA com­prom­ised in­ter­na­tion­al com­mu­nic­a­tions web­sites used by hun­dreds of mil­lions of users around the world,” he said.

A U.S. De­part­ment of De­fense spokes­man de­clined to talk spe­cific­ally about what the United States is do­ing to mon­it­or and de­fend against cy­ber at­tacks from Syr­ia.

Air Force Lt. Col. Dami­en Pick­art, though, in an emailed re­sponse to ques­tions noted: “We’ve seen a series of at­tacks claimed by the Syr­i­an Elec­tron­ic Army over the past sev­er­al years, so the re­cent at­tacks were not a new phe­nomen­on.”

He said the Pentagon “takes ser­i­ously its mis­sion to de­fend the na­tion from any group that at­tempts to use cy­ber­space to threaten U.S. se­cur­ity or na­tion­al in­terests.”

The U.S. gov­ern­ment routinely shares threat in­form­a­tion with the private sec­tor through the De­part­ment of Home­land Se­cur­ity in or­der to “mit­ig­ate much of the threat activ­ity we have seen re­cently,” the Pentagon spokes­man noted.

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