OHIO | OH-1

Barr Drops Primary Bid After Pureval Enters Race

A new congressional redistricting plan passed the Ohio state House.

Ally Mutnick
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Ally Mutnick
Feb. 7, 2018, 11:23 a.m.

Rabbi Robert Barr (D) “said Tuesday he was dropping his campaign to make way for” Hamilton County Clerk of Courts Aftab Pureval (D), who “announced his bid last week” against Rep. Steve Chabot (R). Pureval “could have faced a nettlesome Democratic primary against Barr, who had raised a significant amount of money in his short-lived campaign. But Barr said he would clear the path so Pureval could train his fire on Chabot.” (Cincinnati Enquirer)

Meanwhile, Pureval’s fiance “filed a police report Monday night saying that she has been stalked at their Hyde Park home since before he announced” his campaign last week. “According to the police report, which lists Pureval as a ‘reportee’ and his fiancee, Whitney Whitis, as the victim, ‘suspects are sitting outside the victim’s house at all hours of the day’ since Jan. 29. The suspects, who are not named in the report, have attempted to photograph Whitis ‘and have come onto the victim’s property banging loudly on the door, yelling at the victim and attempting to photograph through the windows,’ the report said.”

“The Chabot campaign has indicated it is going to make an issue of Pureval’s residency. Pureval’s home is in the 2nd Congressional District, not the 1st.” A “photo of him entering the house, which is for sale, after having said he moved could be exploited politically. Pureval has not been back to the house since the campaign announcement. The Chabot campaign had volunteers at the house to see if Pureval still lived there as of Thursday, Feb. 1, said spokesman Cody Rizzuto, but none have been there since then. Whoever was involved in the alleged incident was not associated with Chabot, he said.” (Cincinnati Business Courier)

REDISTRICTING WATCH. “Ohioans will vote in May to change how the state draws its congressional districts to a process that supporters say will lead to fairer, more competitive districts,” after the state House approved on Tuesday what was “the culmination of months of behind-the-scenes maneuvering by legislators to craft a bipartisan reform plan that could block a citizen-initiated amendment slated for the November ballot.”

The May vote will be “on several changes intended to increase minority party legislators’ voice during the redistricting process and reduce politicians’ ability to draw districts that favor a political party or incumbent. If approved by voters, the changes would take effect for the next redistricting process in 2021. Republicans have controlled 12 of Ohio’s 16 seats every election since GOP officials drew the maps in 2011 but only garnered 56 percent of the votes cast statewide.” (Cleveland.com)

What We're Following See More »
LOAN IN EXCHANGE FOR WHITE HOUSE JOB?
Investigators Looking at More Manafort Shenanigans
15 hours ago
THE LATEST
HEARING THIS AFTERNOON
Mueller Indicts Attorney for Making False Statements About Gates
1 days ago
THE LATEST
THE QUESTION
What’s the Value of Suspicious Transactions by Paul Manafort that Mueller Is Investigating?
1 days ago
THE ANSWER

About $40 million, "a much larger sum than was cited in his October indictment on money laundering charges."

Source:
CHINESE INVESTORS AS WELL AS RUSSIANS
Mueller Looking into Kushner Finances
2 days ago
THE LATEST

"Special counsel Robert Mueller's interest in Jared Kushner has expanded beyond his contacts with Russia and now includes his efforts to secure financing for his company from foreign investors during the presidential transition, according to people familiar with the inquiry. This is the first indication that Mueller is exploring Kushner's discussions with potential non-Russian foreign investors, including in China." At issue specifically is his quest for financing help on the beleaguered 666 Fifth Avenue building.

Source:
INDICTMENTS NOT PROOF OF COLLUSION
Rosenstein Holds Presser On Russian Indictments
5 days ago
THE DETAILS
Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login