People

On the Move: March 16, 2013

Easy transition: Jon Kyl (Richard A. Bloom) 
©2013 Richard A. Bloom
Add to Briefcase
Christopher Snow Hopkins and Erin Mershon
March 14, 2013, 3:55 p.m.

At the Bar

Jon Kyl

Former Sen. Jon Kyl is swap­ping his con­stitu­ent rolls for a cli­ent list as he joins the pub­lic-policy and glob­al-af­fairs team at Cov­ing­ton & Burl­ing.

The Ari­zona Re­pub­lic­an is look­ing for­ward to provid­ing the firm’s cli­ents with the same kind of coun­sel­ing and ad­vocacy he did for his con­stitu­ents. “It’s what I’ve done be­fore. It’s just rep­res­ent­ing a dif­fer­ent group of people. And I don’t get a vote,” he joked.

The former Sen­ate minor­ity whip said he will be work­ing on tax policy, health care, na­tion­al se­cur­ity, and in­tel­lec­tu­al-prop­erty mat­ters, draw­ing on his ex­per­i­ence on the Fin­ance and Ju­di­ciary com­mit­tees.

“The op­por­tun­ity to use what I’ve learned I think is what was the most ap­peal­ing to me,” Kyl says. “Us­ing what I’ve learned with en­tit­ies where it can really make a big dif­fer­ence, and who them­selves make a big dif­fer­ence — and the kind of cli­en­tele that ex­ists at Cov­ing­ton is ex­actly that op­por­tun­ity for me.”

In ad­di­tion to his work at the firm, Kyl is a vis­it­ing fel­low at the Amer­ic­an En­ter­prise In­sti­tute, which also an­nounced this week that he and former Sen. Joe Lieber­man, ID-Conn., will co­chair the Amer­ic­an In­ter­na­tion­al­ism Pro­ject at its Mar­ilyn Ware Cen­ter for Se­cur­ity Stud­ies.

Kyl, 70, an­nounced his re­tire­ment from Con­gress last year after four terms in the House and three in the Sen­ate.

Erin Mer­s­hon

Im­age-Makers

John Ullyot

John Ullyot (Chet Susslin) National Journal
Loyal Spartan: Kristi Rogers (Richard A. Bloom) ©2013 Richard A. Bloom

Former Sen. Jon Kyl is swap­ping his con­stitu­ent rolls for a cli­ent list as he joins the pub­lic-policy and glob­al-af­fairs team at Cov­ing­ton & Burl­ing.

The Ari­zona Re­pub­lic­an is look­ing for­ward to provid­ing the firm’s cli­ents with the same kind of coun­sel­ing and ad­vocacy he did for his con­stitu­ents. “It’s what I’ve done be­fore. It’s just rep­res­ent­ing a dif­fer­ent group of people. And I don’t get a vote,” he joked.

The former Sen­ate minor­ity whip said he will be work­ing on tax policy, health care, na­tion­al se­cur­ity, and in­tel­lec­tu­al-prop­erty mat­ters, draw­ing on his ex­per­i­ence on the Fin­ance and Ju­di­ciary com­mit­tees.

“The op­por­tun­ity to use what I’ve learned I think is what was the most ap­peal­ing to me,” Kyl says. “Us­ing what I’ve learned with en­tit­ies where it can really make a big dif­fer­ence, and who them­selves make a big dif­fer­ence — and the kind of cli­en­tele that ex­ists at Cov­ing­ton is ex­actly that op­por­tun­ity for me.”

In ad­di­tion to his work at the firm, Kyl is a vis­it­ing fel­low at the Amer­ic­an En­ter­prise In­sti­tute, which also an­nounced this week that he and former Sen. Joe Lieber­man, ID-Conn., will co­chair the Amer­ic­an In­ter­na­tion­al­ism Pro­ject at its Mar­ilyn Ware Cen­ter for Se­cur­ity Stud­ies.

Kyl, 70, an­nounced his re­tire­ment from Con­gress last year after four terms in the House and three in the Sen­ate.

Erin Mer­s­hon

Im­age-Makers

John Ullyot

When of­fi­cials at the Uni­versity of Vir­gin­ia summoned John Ullyot last year, he knew the mes­sage about the school’s lead­er­ship tur­moil would have to be “care­fully craf­ted.”

This was not his first “high-in­tens­ity en­gage­ment.” Ullyot man­aged com­mu­nic­a­tions for the Sen­ate Armed Ser­vices Com­mit­tee dur­ing its in­vest­ig­a­tion of tor­ture and ab­use at Bagh­dad’s Abu Ghraib pris­on. In the private sec­tor, he ad­vised DHL when the Ger­man lo­gist­ics com­pany shuttered a hub in Wilm­ing­ton, Ohio, and in­furi­ated the state’s con­gres­sion­al del­eg­a­tion. But the crisis that en­vel­oped the Uni­versity of Vir­gin­ia was a dif­fer­ent an­im­al.

A few days be­fore Ullyot’s ar­rival in Char­lottes­ville, the uni­versity’s board had sacked Pres­id­ent Teresa Sul­li­van, cit­ing her un­will­ing­ness to make “hard de­cisions” in the face of dwind­ling re­sources. The ouster of the pop­u­lar pres­id­ent en­raged stu­dents and fac­ulty mem­bers, and their protests made na­tion­al news, in­clud­ing the front pages of The Wash­ing­ton Post.

“Had we been brought in ahead of time, we could have looked at wheth­er or not [fir­ing Sul­li­van] was a good idea,” he says. “The best repu­ta­tion-man­age­ment is to deal with something be­fore it ac­tu­ally be­comes a crisis”…. In this case, we were brought in after there had been a pre­cip­it­at­ing in­cid­ent.”

Even­tu­ally, the board of vis­it­ors de­cided to re­in­state Sul­li­van. “My task was to fig­ure out how to bring her back in a way that would pre­serve the board’s strength and in­de­pend­ence and not have them look like they had been pres­sured,” Ullyot says. The press ex­cor­i­ated Rect­or Helen Dra­gas — an op-ed in The Post de­scribed her as “di­vis­ive and tone-deaf” — but she ul­ti­mately sur­vived the fiasco.

Months later, Ullyot was at a me­mori­al ser­vice at Deer­field Academy in west­ern Mas­sachu­setts when he was ap­proached by Dave Fuente, who had run with him on Deer­field’s cross-coun­try team. Fuente, a UVA gradu­ate and the chair­man of New York City-based SSA & Co., had seen Ullyot’s name in con­nec­tion with the bungled ouster at the uni­versity and noted that High Lan­tern Group, a sub­si­di­ary of SSA, spe­cial­ized in crisis com­mu­nic­a­tions. Be­fore long, Fuente had ar­ranged for Ullyot to meet with Daniel Cas­se, a man­aging part­ner at the firm.

Earli­er this month, Ullyot was named a man­aging dir­ect­or at High Lan­tern Group. The 44-year-old was most re­cently a seni­or vice pres­id­ent with Hill + Know­lton Strategies, where his cli­ents in­cluded Medtron­ic, DHL, Ford, De­loitte, med­ic­al-device-maker Zi­m­mer, Pf­izer, EADS, and the Mar­ine Corps.

A gradu­ate of Har­vard Uni­versity, Ullyot served as an in­tel­li­gence of­ficer in the Mar­ines, where he was also a com­pet­it­ive skeet shoot­er and a li­ais­on in French Guyana (mer­it­ing a medal from the French For­eign Le­gion). Early in his ca­reer, he was a spokes­man for then-Sens. Rudy Boschwitz, R-Minn., and Ar­len Specter, R-Pa., after which he worked as vice pres­id­ent of cor­por­ate com­mu­nic­a­tions for AOL Europe. Ullyot later re­turned to pub­lic ser­vice, serving as com­mu­nic­a­tions dir­ect­or for two Sen­ate com­mit­tees, as deputy chief of staff for then-Sen. John Warner, R-Va., and as a na­tion­al me­dia spokes­man at the 2008 Re­pub­lic­an Na­tion­al Con­ven­tion in St. Paul, Minn.

Chris­toph­er Snow Hop­kins

At the Bar

Kristi Ro­gers

“Usu­ally people look at me like I’m crazy when I say I en­joyed liv­ing in Ir­aq,” says Kristi Ro­gers, who was an aide to then-Co­ali­tion Pro­vi­sion­al Au­thor­ity Ad­min­is­trat­or Paul Bremer for nine months after the 2003 U.S. in­va­sion of that Middle East coun­try.

Chan­nel­ing her in­ner Charles Dick­ens, she calls her as­sign­ment “some of the best times, some of the worst times.” Along with the Ir­aqi min­is­ters of In­teri­or, Health, and Youth and Sports, Ro­gers sur­veyed the volat­ile area “look­ing at what was work­ing and what wasn’t.”

She brings this ori­ent­a­tion to­ward “in­dus­tries and pro­jects in need of sta­bil­iz­a­tion” to her new po­s­i­tion at Man­att, Phelps & Phil­lips, where she has been named a man­aging dir­ect­or in the firm’s Wash­ing­ton of­fice. Many of Ro­gers’s cli­ents ex­pect to be hammered by the across-the-board fed­er­al spend­ing cuts that went in­to ef­fect this month. Be­fore speak­ing with Na­tion­al Journ­al this week, she met with the CEO of a large de­fense con­tract­or to hash out the dire rami­fic­a­tions of se­quest­ra­tion.

“How does he, as an em­ploy­er, get a bet­ter sense, or any sense at all, from the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment in terms of what he needs to tell his em­ploy­ees and how he can plan his cash-flow and budget? “… He hasn’t got­ten any guid­ance or any word.”

Ro­gers grew up in Lans­ing, Mich., the daugh­ter of an Air Force col­on­el and a second-grade teach­er. As a gradu­ate of Michigan State Uni­versity, she “bleeds green,” Ro­gers says, and loathes the rival Uni­versity of Michigan’s maize and blue.

Her first job was as an aide to then-Gov. John En­gler, R-Mich., after which she be­came vice pres­id­ent of gov­ern­ment and com­munity af­fairs for the Grand Rap­ids Area Cham­ber of Com­merce. Ro­gers ar­rived in Wash­ing­ton as a staffer in the Small Busi­ness Ad­min­is­tra­tion’s Of­fice of En­tre­pren­eur­i­al De­vel­op­ment and went on to serve as as­sist­ant com­mis­sion­er of pub­lic af­fairs at U.S. Cus­toms and Bor­der Pro­tec­tion. She was most re­cently the pres­id­ent and CEO of Ae­gis De­fense Ser­vices, a risk-man­age­ment and private-se­cur­ity com­pany.

The 43-year-old is a Lab­ra­doodle wran­gler. “She just bounces off the walls,” Ro­gers says of her ram­bunc­tious com­pan­ion.

C.S.H.

At the Bar

An­gela Gi­an­carlo

In the mid-1990s, when An­gela Gi­an­carlo was an in­tern in the Fed­er­al Com­mu­nic­a­tions Com­mis­sion’s Me­dia Bur­eau, Mi­chael Wag­n­er gave her some words of ad­vice. “Wire­less is the wave of the fu­ture,” the gov­ern­ment law­yer told Gi­an­carlo, then in her second year at Cath­ol­ic Uni­versity’s Colum­bus School of Law. “I think it would be­hoove you to get some ex­per­i­ence” in that arena.

Wag­n­er’s proph­ecy would come to pass: In 2011, people bought more smart­phones world­wide than the boxy, un­wieldy devices known as PCs.

“How do you thank someone for ad­vice like that!” ex­claims Gi­an­carlo, who is join­ing May­er Brown after eight years at the FCC. As a part­ner in the firm’s Wash­ing­ton of­fice, she will con­cen­trate on reg­u­lat­ory and com­pli­ance mat­ters rel­ev­ant to the tech sec­tor.

“Ad­mit­tedly, it was dif­fi­cult to leave the gov­ern­ment,” she says. “But it was time for someone new to have a turn. I stayed much longer than I would have pre­dicted.”

Gi­an­carlo grew up in Wil­li­ams­ville, N.Y., where her fath­er was a sixth-grade teach­er. As a seni­or in high school, she in­terned for the Erie County Le­gis­lature, which sparked her in­terest in pub­lic af­fairs. Gi­an­carlo en­rolled at Trin­ity Col­lege in Wash­ing­ton, where she ma­jored in polit­ic­al sci­ence (with minors in French and his­tory) while sim­ul­tan­eously in­tern­ing for then-Rep. Jack Kemp, R-N.Y. Upon gradu­at­ing, she joined his staff.

In the years that fol­lowed, Gi­an­carlo moved to a num­ber of jobs around town be­fore she “fi­nally stopped pro­cras­tin­at­ing and went to law school.” She re­ceived her de­gree in 1996, the same year a new tele­com­mu­nic­a­tions law was en­acted. After a stint at the Al­ex­an­dria, Va.-based Wire­less In­fra­struc­ture As­so­ci­ation, Gi­an­carlo prac­ticed law at Hogan & Hartson, where one of her cli­ents, Alaska Nat­ive Wire­less, par­ti­cip­ated in a wire­less-fre­quen­cies auc­tion that was even­tu­ally in­val­id­ated by the Su­preme Court. “It was a new as­so­ci­ate’s dream to lit­er­ally take something all the way from its in­fancy right through to the Su­preme Court,” she says. “The spec­trum that was auc­tioned had been re­claimed by the FCC after the own­er, Nex­t­Wave Wire­less, de­clared bank­ruptcy”…. Nex­t­Wave’s ar­gu­ment, which pre­vailed, was that the agency’s reg­u­la­tions can­not trump bank­ruptcy law.”

Gi­an­carlo lives in Al­ex­an­dria, Va., with her hus­band and 13-year-old son.

C.S.H.

×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login