Indiana Primary Cheat Sheet

Everything you need to know for Tuesday’s Hoosier State showdown.

Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop in Fort Wayne, Ind., on Sunday.
AP Photo/Darron Cummings
Adam Wollner
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Adam Wollner
May 2, 2016, 11:56 a.m.

After dominating last week’s primaries in the northeast, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are seeking knockout blows in Indiana. Here’s what you need to know before the results start rolling in Tuesday:

Poll times: The polls are open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. local time, so all polls in Indiana will close by 7 p.m. ET.

Results: The Associated Press will report the results here as they come in.

Delegates: The Republicans have 57 total delegates up for grabs, 30 of which go to the overall statewide winner. The other 27 are awarded to the top vote-getter in each of the state’s nine congressional districts. The Democrats have 83 pledged delegates at stake, as well as nine super delegates, who are free to support any candidate.

What to watch for: If recent polling is correct, Trump has an opportunity to sweep all 57 of Indiana’s delegates, which would be a devastating blow to Ted Cruz and the “Stop Trump” movement. An NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist survey found the real estate mogul with a 15-point lead over the senator from Texas. Trump should run particularly strong in the blue-collar 1st District, which is situated in the northwestern part of the state, and the 8th and 9th districts further south. Cruz’s best chance for success will likely come in the conservative 3rd District, located in the northeastern corner of the state, and the 5th District in central Indiana, which boasts the highest share of college-educated voters. Despite his pact with Cruz, John Kasich is still polling in the double-digits in Indiana and could rack up support in the eastern region, which shares a border with Ohio.

On the Democratic side, the race is looking as tight as it was in 2008. The NBC/WSJ poll showed Bernie Sanders trailing by 4 points to Clinton, who beat Barack Obama in Indiana by 1.4 points eight years ago. Obama performed best in the vote-rich counties of Marion (home to Indianapolis), Lake (home to Gary), and Allen (home to Fort Wayne), while Clinton largely cleaned up in the rest of the state. But this time, Clinton will likely run better in the population centers and Sanders in the more rural areas. The state’s open primary system should help the Vermont senator, who has been buoyed by independent voters throughout the campaign.

Looking ahead: After Tuesday, the June 7 California primary is the most important contest left on the calendar. Of the 445 GOP delegates still on the board after Tuesday, nearly 40 percent come from California. And the Golden State accounts for more than half of the remaining 926 pledged Democratic delegates.

What We're Following See More »
DISCOVERED BY COMMERCIAL SATELLITES
North Korea Continuing Missile Program At Secret Sites
6 hours ago
THE DETAILS

"North Korea is moving ahead with its ballistic missile program at 16 hidden bases ... identified in new commercial satellite images." The images suggest that North Korea has "offered to dismantle a major launching site — a step it began, then halted — while continuing to make improvements at more than a dozen others that would bolster launches of conventional and nuclear warheads."

Source:
STAFFERS ALREADY INVESTIGATING
Democrats Plan to Probe Payments to Clifford, McDougal
7 hours ago
THE LATEST

"When the Democrats take control of the House in January and gain subpoena power, they plan to probe the president's role in payments to two women who alleged during the 2016 campaign that they had affairs with" the president. "Democratic members on the committee have already begun digging into the president's involvement, according to [an] aide. In September, the committee requested documents from the Trump organization."

Source:
DAMON NELSON HAD WORKED FOR NUNES SINCE 2003
Staff Director for House Intel Committee Passes Away
7 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Damon Nelson, the staff director for the House Intelligence Committee, died unexpectedly after a brief illness, according to a statement from Chairman Devin Nunes. Nelson and Nunes first met in high school, and Nelson worked for the congressmen since his freshmen term 15 years ago. He started "as his legislative director in 2003 before becoming his deputy chief of staff. When Nunes became chairman of the Intelligence Committee in 2015, Nelson went to work for him there, becoming staff director a year later."

Source:
CASE CHALLENGES MUELLER'S AUTHORITY
Appeals Court Asks for Briefings on Acting AG
3 days ago
THE LATEST
LEAVES JEFFRIES AND LEE
Linda Sanchez Won't Run for Caucus Chair
3 days ago
THE LATEST
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login