Lack of Diversity in Medical Research Is Bad for Your Health

Low participation of minority populations in clinical trials can lead to development of medicines that are dangerous for the people using them.

BALTIMORE - APRIL 5: Nurse Coordinator Lisa Chrisley (R) injects an experimental flu vaccine into the arm of volunteer Kwisa Kang of Mt. Washington, Maryland, a medical school researcher, during a clinical trial to test the effectiveness of the vaccine to combat avian influenza April 5, 2005 at University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. The trial aims to find out if the vaccine can protect people from a lethal avian flu strain, also known as H5N1, which was first detected in chickens and other birds in Hong Kong in 1997, claiming the life of a three-year old boy. There have been at least 69 more confirmed cases with 46 deaths since then, mostly in Vietnam and Thailand. University of Maryland School of Medicine was one of three U.S. sites that took part in the trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
National Journal
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