Al-Qaida Calls for Car Bombs Across America

Top targets? Big cities, tennis tournaments, and holiday gatherings.

National Journal
Jordain Carney
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Jordain Carney
March 19, 2014, 1:01 p.m.

Al-Qaida is us­ing the latest edi­tion of its magazine to call for car bombs across the United States and oth­er “cru­sader coun­tries.”

The Spring 2014 edi­tion of In­spire de­tails how to build a bomb and sug­gests the best way to plan and ex­ecute a suc­cess­ful at­tack.

Un­sur­pris­ingly, the magazine notes that “Amer­ica is our first tar­get,” and it re­com­mends Wash­ing­ton (spe­cific­ally res­taur­ants and bars on M Street), North­ern Vir­gin­ia (in­clud­ing Ar­ling­ton and Al­ex­an­dria), Chica­go, New York, and Los Angeles as spe­cif­ic tar­gets.

In ad­di­tion, it notes that a po­ten­tial ter­ror­ist should look for places “flooded with in­di­vidu­als,” in­clud­ing sports events — spe­cific­ally the U.S. Open ten­nis tour­na­ment, cam­paign events, fest­ivals, and hol­i­day gath­er­ings on Christ­mas, New Year’s Eve, or New Year’s Day.

“The im­port­ant thing is that you tar­get people and not build­ings,” notes the art­icle, loc­ated in the magazine’s “Open Source Ji­had” sec­tion.

And with the Bo­ston Mara­thon com­ing up next month, the art­icle strikes a sober­ingly fa­mil­i­ar note with a re­cipe on how to build a bomb us­ing a pres­sure cook­er — the type used in the April 2013 at­tack.

Top de­fense and Home­land Se­cur­ity of­fi­cials have warned about an in­creas­ing risk from in­di­vidu­als who work alone to plan or carry out a ter­ror­ist at­tack without dir­ect in­struc­tions from a ter­ror­ist or­gan­iz­a­tion.

DHS Sec­ret­ary Jeh John­son said last month that the Bo­ston Mara­thon bomb­ing could be “a sign of the fu­ture” and that ter­ror­ist threats from so-called “lone wolf” or “self-rad­ic­al­ized” ter­ror­ists are in many ways harder to de­tect.

DHS didn’t im­me­di­ately re­spond to a re­quest for com­ment on the magazine art­icle.

What We're Following See More »
CITES CONFLICT OF INTEREST
Lieberman Withdraws from Consideration for FBI Job
1 days ago
THE LATEST
MINIMUM 2 PERCENT GDP
Trump Tells NATO Countries To Pay Up
1 days ago
BREAKING
MANAFORT AND FLYNN
Russians Discussed Influencing Trump Through Aides
1 days ago
THE DETAILS

"American spies collected information last summer revealing that senior Russian intelligence and political officials were discussing how to exert influence over Donald J. Trump through his advisers." The conversations centered around Paul Manafort, who was campaign chairman at the time, and Michael Flynn, former national security adviser and then a close campaign surrogate. Both men have been tied heavily with Russia and Flynn is currently at the center of the FBI investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Source:
BUT WHITE HOUSE MAY USE AGAINST HIM ANYWAY
Ethics Cops Clear Mueller to Work on Trump Case
3 days ago
THE LATEST

"Former FBI Director Robert Mueller has been cleared by U.S. Department of Justice ethics experts to oversee an investigation into possible collusion between then-candidate Donald Trump's 2016 election campaign and Russia." Some had speculated that the White House would use "an ethics rule limiting government attorneys from investigating people their former law firm represented" to trip up Mueller's appointment. Jared Kushner is a client of Mueller's firm, WilmerHale. "Although Mueller has now been cleared by the Justice Department, the White House may still use his former law firm's connection to Manafort and Kushner to undermine the findings of his investigation, according to two sources close to the White House."

Source:
BUSINESSES CAN’T PLEAD FIFTH
Senate Intel to Subpoena Two of Flynn’s Businesses
3 days ago
THE LATEST

Senate Intelligence Committee chairman Richard Burr (R-NC) and ranking member Mark Warner (D-VA) will subpoena two businesses owned by former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. Burr said, "We would like to hear from General Flynn. We'd like to see his documents. We'd like him to tell his story because he publicly said he had a story to tell."

×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login