John McCain: Classified Senate Report on Torture ‘Chilling’

The Republican says some aspects of the report, which have not yet been made public, are too upsetting to repeat.

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 13: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee member Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) (R) questions former Department of Defense General Counsel Jeh Johnson during his confirmation hearing to be the next Secretary of Homeland Security with committee Chairman Tom Carper (D-DE) (L) and Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI) in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill November 13, 2013 in Washington, DC. If confirmed by the Senate, Johnson would replace Secretary Janet Napolitano who left DHS in September.
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Sarah Mimms
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Sarah Mimms
April 1, 2014, 11:10 a.m.

The Sen­ate In­tel­li­gence Com­mit­tee’s re­port on in­ter­rog­a­tion tech­niques em­ployed by the CIA in the wake of the Sept. 11 at­tacks in­cludes a num­ber of “chilling” stor­ies of the use of tor­ture by Amer­ic­an of­fi­cials that have not yet been re­leased to the pub­lic, Sen. John Mc­Cain said Tues­day.

The ex­ist­ence of the re­port and some of its con­tents, in­clud­ing that co­er­cive tech­niques such as wa­ter­board­ing did not lead to the cap­ture of Osama bin Laden, were first re­por­ted by The Wash­ing­ton Post on Monday.

The 6,300-page re­port is clas­si­fied, but the In­tel­li­gence Com­mit­tee, headed by Chair­wo­man Di­anne Fein­stein, will push Thursday for the Obama ad­min­is­tra­tion to de­clas­si­fy a 400-page ex­ec­ut­ive sum­mary, The Post re­por­ted.

Asked about the re­port, Mc­Cain said it of­fers fur­ther evid­ence of the in­ef­fi­cien­cies of us­ing tor­ture on Amer­ic­an en­emies. “When you tor­ture someone they will say any­thing you want to hear to make the pain stop. So I nev­er, ever be­lieved this bo­logna that, well, be­cause of wa­ter­board­ing they got in­form­a­tion,” he said.

Mc­Cain said he has not read the re­port him­self, but has “heard a lot about it.” He de­clined to com­ment on any­thing that was not in­cluded in the ori­gin­al Wash­ing­ton Post re­port on the re­cord, but ad­ded: “There’s a couple stor­ies [in the re­port] that are so chilling that I can’t re­peat them right now.”

Mc­Cain also elab­or­ated on an event that was re­por­ted Monday by The Post, not­ing that of­fi­cials wa­ter­board­ing a ter­ror sus­pect re­por­ted to CIA headquar­ters that they had “got­ten everything we can out of the guy.”

“The mes­sage came back, ‘Wa­ter­board him some more.’ That is un­con­scion­able,” Mc­Cain said.

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