John McCain: Classified Senate Report on Torture ‘Chilling’

The Republican says some aspects of the report, which have not yet been made public, are too upsetting to repeat.

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 13: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee member Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) (R) questions former Department of Defense General Counsel Jeh Johnson during his confirmation hearing to be the next Secretary of Homeland Security with committee Chairman Tom Carper (D-DE) (L) and Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI) in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill November 13, 2013 in Washington, DC. If confirmed by the Senate, Johnson would replace Secretary Janet Napolitano who left DHS in September.
National Journal
Sarah Mimms
Add to Briefcase
Sarah Mimms
April 1, 2014, 11:10 a.m.

The Sen­ate In­tel­li­gence Com­mit­tee’s re­port on in­ter­rog­a­tion tech­niques em­ployed by the CIA in the wake of the Sept. 11 at­tacks in­cludes a num­ber of “chilling” stor­ies of the use of tor­ture by Amer­ic­an of­fi­cials that have not yet been re­leased to the pub­lic, Sen. John Mc­Cain said Tues­day.

The ex­ist­ence of the re­port and some of its con­tents, in­clud­ing that co­er­cive tech­niques such as wa­ter­board­ing did not lead to the cap­ture of Osama bin Laden, were first re­por­ted by The Wash­ing­ton Post on Monday.

The 6,300-page re­port is clas­si­fied, but the In­tel­li­gence Com­mit­tee, headed by Chair­wo­man Di­anne Fein­stein, will push Thursday for the Obama ad­min­is­tra­tion to de­clas­si­fy a 400-page ex­ec­ut­ive sum­mary, The Post re­por­ted.

Asked about the re­port, Mc­Cain said it of­fers fur­ther evid­ence of the in­ef­fi­cien­cies of us­ing tor­ture on Amer­ic­an en­emies. “When you tor­ture someone they will say any­thing you want to hear to make the pain stop. So I nev­er, ever be­lieved this bo­logna that, well, be­cause of wa­ter­board­ing they got in­form­a­tion,” he said.

Mc­Cain said he has not read the re­port him­self, but has “heard a lot about it.” He de­clined to com­ment on any­thing that was not in­cluded in the ori­gin­al Wash­ing­ton Post re­port on the re­cord, but ad­ded: “There’s a couple stor­ies [in the re­port] that are so chilling that I can’t re­peat them right now.”

Mc­Cain also elab­or­ated on an event that was re­por­ted Monday by The Post, not­ing that of­fi­cials wa­ter­board­ing a ter­ror sus­pect re­por­ted to CIA headquar­ters that they had “got­ten everything we can out of the guy.”

“The mes­sage came back, ‘Wa­ter­board him some more.’ That is un­con­scion­able,” Mc­Cain said.

What We're Following See More »
CITE NEW REGULATIONS ON NON-PROFIT REPORTING
Dems on Finance Committee Get Cold Feet on IRS Nominee
2 hours ago
THE LATEST
THE QUESTION
How Much Will Trump's Military Parade Cost?
2 hours ago
THE ANSWER

About $12 million, according to an initial estimate shared with CNN.

Source:
"NOT FOR LONG," HE SAYS
Trump Lashes Out at EU for Google Fine
3 hours ago
THE LATEST
ARMS CONTROL, SYRIA WERE DISCUSSED
Russians Refer to "Verbal Agreements" with Trump
14 hours ago
THE LATEST

"Two days after President Trump’s summit with Russian President Vladi­mir Putin, Russian officials offered a string of assertions about what the two leaders had achieved. 'Important verbal agreements' were reached at the Helsinki meeting, Russia’s ambassador to the United States, Anatoly Antonov, told reporters in Moscow Wednesday, including preservation of the New Start and INF agreements," and cooperation in Syria.

Source:
WAS "GRUDGINGLY" CONVINCED
Trump Was Shown Proof of Russian Interference Before Inauguration
15 hours ago
THE LATEST

"Two weeks before his inauguration, Donald J. Trump was shown highly classified intelligence indicating that President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia had personally ordered complex cyberattacks to sway the 2016 American election. The evidence included texts and emails from Russian military officers and information gleaned from a top-secret source close to Mr. Putin, who had described to the C.I.A. how the Kremlin decided to execute its campaign of hacking and disinformation. Mr. Trump sounded grudgingly convinced, according to several people who attended the intelligence briefing. But ever since, Mr. Trump has tried to cloud the very clear findings that he received on Jan. 6, 2017, which his own intelligence leaders have unanimously endorsed."

×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login