A LOOK AHEAD

Global Security Newswire Staff
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Global Security Newswire Staff
April 18, 2014, 6:30 a.m.

What’s next on non­pro­lif­er­a­tion and in­ter­na­tion­al se­cur­ity, in Wash­ing­ton and around the globe.

— April 22:  Could there be “light of the end of the tun­nel” to­ward a Fis­sile Ma­ter­i­al Cut-off Treaty? That’s the ques­tion for an event at Har­vard Uni­versity’s Belfer Cen­ter for Sci­ence and In­ter­na­tion­al Af­fairs. Seni­or Fel­low Olli Heinon­en will present off-the-re­cord re­flec­tions at the Cam­bridge, Mass., cam­pus fol­low­ing a meet­ing of gov­ern­ment­al ex­perts on the stalled in­ter­na­tion­al talks.

— April 22: With the Rus­sia-Ukraine fal­lout con­tinu­ing to dom­in­ate the news, the Johns Hop­kins Uni­versity Paul H. Nitze School of Ad­vanced In­ter­na­tion­al Stud­ies in Wash­ing­ton is of­fer­ing a dis­cus­sion, titled “Rus­sia and the West in Crisis: Con­flict and Com­pet­i­tion in East­ern Europe and the Cau­cas­us.” Ger­man schol­ar on Rus­si­an af­fairs Hannes Ad­omeit is the guest speak­er.

— April 22: A sim­il­ar top­ic is on tap across town at the Na­tion­al De­fense Uni­versity. Steven Pifer of the Brook­ings In­sti­tu­tion will dis­cuss the “Crisis in Ukraine, the Bud­apest Memor­andum and Ex­ten­ded De­terrence.”

— April 23: The is­sue of cy­ber­se­cur­ity as it per­tains to gov­ern­ment or­gan­iz­a­tions in the en­ergy arena is the top­ic of a break­fast dis­cus­sion or­gan­ized by the Armed Forces Com­mu­nic­a­tions and Elec­tron­ic As­so­ci­ation in Wash­ing­ton. Of­fi­cials from the En­ergy De­part­ment, the Na­tion­al Nuc­le­ar Se­cur­ity Ad­min­is­tra­tion and the Fed­er­al En­ergy Reg­u­lat­ory Com­mis­sion are sched­uled to speak.

— April 23: Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh will de­liv­er re­marks about the fu­ture of the Air Force at a Na­tion­al Press Club break­fast event. The ser­vice com­mands two legs of the nuc­le­ar tri­ad: long-range bombers and in­ter­con­tin­ent­al bal­list­ic mis­siles. Is­sues sur­round­ing the lat­ter have caused some con­tro­versy of late.

— April 23: The Middle East Policy Coun­cil holds its an­nu­al Cap­it­ol Hill Con­fer­ence, titled “U.S. Se­cur­ity Com­mit­ments to the Gulf Ar­ab States.” Vari­ous ex-gov­ern­ment in­siders par­ti­cip­ate, in­clud­ing Colin Kahl, the Pentagon’s former point man on Middle East­ern af­fairs.

— April 24: An At­lantic Coun­cil dis­cus­sion aims to il­lu­min­ate the “op­por­tun­ity cost” of con­flict between nuc­le­ar-armed rivals In­dia and Pakistan. With a new gov­ern­ment in place in Is­lamabad and an­oth­er soon to be voted in­to of­fice in New Del­hi, speak­ers at the Wash­ing­ton event will dis­cuss the pos­sib­il­ity of chan­ging the “nar­rat­ive of con­flict,” ac­cord­ing to the event an­nounce­ment.

— April 24: A Wash­ing­ton con­fer­ence at the United States In­sti­tute of Peace will fea­ture faith, sci­ence, dip­lo­mat­ic and policy lead­ers for talks about the hu­man­it­ari­an con­sequences of nuc­le­ar war. An­ita Friedt, the State De­part­ment’s prin­cip­al deputy as­sist­ant sec­ret­ary for nuc­le­ar and stra­tegic policy, is sched­uled to give an up­date on the vis­ion laid out in Pres­id­ent Obama’s fam­ous 2009 Prague speech on nuc­le­ar weapons.

— April 24-25: The En­ergy De­part­ment’s Of­fice of Sci­ence holds a meet­ing in Beth­esda, Md., cov­er­ing vari­ous nuc­le­ar sci­ence-re­lated top­ics. On the agenda is the semi-autonom­ous Na­tion­al Nuc­le­ar Se­cur­ity Ad­min­is­tra­tion’s charge to de­vel­op a do­mest­ic sup­ply of mo­lyb­denum-99, which is used in the med­ic­al field. The Obama ad­min­is­tra­tion aims to pro­duce such ra­dioiso­topes without us­ing weapons-grade highly en­riched urani­um.

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