Roundup

The Complicated Story Behind School Resegregation

ProPublica takes readers to Tuscaloosa, Ala., where it can seem like Brown v. Board of Education never happened.

In June 1963, a federal court barred any state government interference with the enrollment of two black students, Vivian Malone and James Hood, at the University of Alabama. Today, Central High School in Tuscaloosa once again has an all-black student population.
National Journal
Sophie Quinton
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Sophie Quinton
April 21, 2014, 9:02 a.m.

Here’s a roundup of the edu­ca­tion art­icles that caught Next Amer­ica’s eye from April 14-21. All ad­dress trends that par­tic­u­larly af­fect minor­ity stu­dents.

The Re­seg­reg­a­tion of Pub­lic Schools. Black chil­dren across the South now at­tend ma­jor­ity-black schools at levels not seen in four dec­ades. In Tus­ca­loosa, Ala., city fin­an­cial in­terests, angry voters, and white flight all con­trib­uted to the re­seg­reg­a­tion of Cent­ral High School, once one of the South’s biggest in­teg­ra­tion suc­cess stor­ies. The school now il­lus­trates how clus­ter­ing low-in­come, minor­ity stu­dents to­geth­er can widen achieve­ment gaps. “We wish we could in­ter­act with more Caucasi­an people, ‘cause they seem fun,” D’Leisha Dent, a cur­rent stu­dent at Cent­ral, told NPR. ProP­ub­lica, NPR

Cor­por­al Pun­ish­ment’s Pain­ful Ra­cial Sub­text. Cor­por­al pun­ish­ment is still leg­al in pub­lic schools in 19 states, mostly in the South — and Afric­an-Amer­ic­an stu­dents are more likely to get dis­cip­lined with a wooden paddle than white stu­dents are. In some com­munit­ies, the wield­ers of the paddle are black them­selves. Sup­port­ers of­ten cite the Bible, and the role phys­ic­al pun­ish­ment played in their own up­bring­ing. The Hechinger Re­port

Is Texas Meet­ing Its Col­lege Goals? In 2000, Texas law­makers set tar­gets for the num­ber of stu­dents pur­su­ing high­er edu­ca­tion, de­grees awar­ded, the num­ber of na­tion­ally re­cog­nized pro­grams at pub­lic col­leges and uni­versit­ies, and the state’s share of fed­er­al-re­search fund­ing. Al­though the state is on track to achieve most of those goals, prob­lems re­main. His­pan­ic en­roll­ment in high­er edu­ca­tion has lagged, and Texas still faces a gap in the num­ber of stu­dents pre­pared for ca­reers in sci­ence, tech­no­logy, en­gin­eer­ing, and math. Hou­s­ton Chron­icle

Where are the Wo­men in Ap­pren­tice­ship Pro­grams? Wo­men ac­count for less than five per­cent of par­ti­cipants in ap­pren­tice­ship pro­grams na­tion­wide, ac­cord­ing to the Chron­icle of High­er Edu­ca­tion. That may be be­cause job-train­ing op­por­tun­it­ies are most com­mon in male-dom­in­ated trades, like man­u­fac­tur­ing and build­ing. As the White House pledges sup­port for ap­pren­tice­ship pro­grams, com­munity col­leges and oth­er or­gan­iz­a­tions are work­ing to re­cruit more wo­men in­to them. Chron­icle of High­er Edu­ca­tion

Michelle Obama Tours Howard Uni­versity. The first lady toured the his­tor­ic­ally black col­lege with a group of Chica­go pub­lic high school stu­dents last week, as part of her push to pro­mote high­er edu­ca­tion. Along for the ride was rap­per and tele­vi­sion host Bow Wow — formerly Lil’ Bow Wow, tween star of the early 2000s. Bow Wow didn’t go to col­lege, choos­ing in­stead to pur­sue his ca­reer. “No longer is high school the bar,” Michelle Obama told the 37 Chica­go stu­dents. “That is not enough in today’s glob­al­iz­ing eco­nomy. You have to go to col­lege.” In­side High­er Ed

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