Pentagon Eyes Developing Longer-Range Cruise Missile

Global Security Newswire Staff
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Global Security Newswire Staff
April 25, 2014, 8:03 a.m.

The U.S. De­fense De­part­ment is weigh­ing de­vel­op­ment of a new, non-nuc­le­ar cruise mis­sile to hit “im­port­ant” tar­gets from long dis­tances, War is Bor­ing re­ports.

The Pentagon last week re­ques­ted in­form­a­tion on the po­ten­tial for a re­l­at­ively af­ford­able con­ven­tion­al cruise mis­sile with a price tag un­der $2 mil­lion and a max­im­um flight dis­tance great­er than 3,400 miles, the news pub­lic­a­tion said in a Wed­nes­day art­icle. The “stan­doff” weapon’s range would en­able it to be fired out­side the reach of arms held by pos­sible ant­ag­on­ists.

The pro­pos­al is the res­ult of a De­fense Sci­ence Board as­sess­ment of op­tions for the U.S. mil­it­ary to at­tain a tech­no­lo­gic­al edge over its ad­versar­ies around 2030. The Pentagon-con­vened pan­el of out­side ex­perts ad­vises De­fense lead­ers on tech­no­lo­gic­al is­sues.

“The sys­tem would be de­signed to com­ple­ment stra­tegic prompt glob­al strike cap­ab­il­ity,” the Oc­to­ber doc­u­ment says, re­fer­ring to a de­vel­op­ment­al U.S. ca­pa­city to con­duct a non-nuc­le­ar strike against any loc­a­tion in the world in one hour or less.

“Be­cause [a longer-range cruise mis­sile] could be pro­duced at far lower costs, this would al­low ad­equate num­bers of weapons to en­gage mul­tiple tar­gets sim­ul­tan­eously [and] sat­ur­ate en­emy coun­ter­meas­ures,” the re­port states. “It would not be as pre­cise as some more costly sys­tems, but in­stead trades a high­er prob­ab­il­ity of de­tec­tion and some­what lar­ger vul­ner­ab­il­ity for cost.”

The Pentagon ad­vis­ory pan­el warned about pos­sible in­ter­na­tion­al re­per­cus­sions, though, say­ing that “the policy im­plic­a­tions of de­ploy­ing an in­ter­con­tin­ent­al, pre­ci­sion cruise mis­sile with a ca­pa­city to carry re­l­at­ively heavy pay­loads are sig­ni­fic­ant.”

The po­ten­tial for cruise mis­siles to carry nuc­le­ar as well as con­ven­tion­al pay­loads may factor in­to glob­al re­sponses to the pro­posed longer-range weapon, War is Bor­ing said.

What We're Following See More »
PLENTY OF MISTAKES IN COVERT TESTS
Report: U.S. Ill-Equipped to Detect Dirty Bomb
10 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

A DHS report "found gaping holes in domestic nuclear detection and defense capabilities and massive failures during covert testing." A team put in place to assess our readiness capabilities found significant issues in detecting dangerous radioactive and nuclear materials, failing to do so in 30 percent of covert tests conducted over the course of the year. In far too many cases, the person operating the detection device had no idea how to use it. And when the operator did get a hit, he or she relayed sensitive information over unsecured open radio channels."

Source:
WON’T INTERFERE IN STRUCTURING NSC OFFICE
White House to Give McMaster Carte Blanche
13 hours ago
THE LATEST
NAIVE, RISK TAKER
Russia Compiling Dossier on Trump’s Mind
15 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

Retired Russian diplomats and members of Vladimir Putin's staff are compiling a dossier "on Donald Trump's psychological makeup" for the Russian leader. "Among its preliminary conclusions is that the new American leader is a risk-taker who can be naïve, according to a senior Kremlin adviser."

Source:
PLANS TO CURB ITS POWER
Pruitt Confirmed As EPA Head
4 days ago
BREAKING
WOULD HAVE REPLACED FLYNN
Harward Turns Down NSC Job
5 days ago
THE LATEST

"Ret. Vice Adm. Bob Harward turned down President Donald Trump's offer to be national security adviser Thursday, depriving the administration of a top candidate for a critical foreign policy post days after Trump fired Michael Flynn." Among the potential reasons: his family, his lack of assurances that he could build his own team, and that "the White House seems so chaotic."

Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login