Roundup

More ‘Dreamers’ Can Pay In-State Tuition

Virginia and Florida both moved last week to allow certain undocumented residents to pay in-state tuition.

Bolivians Gustavo Mariaca (L) and his brother Diego (standing) fill out paperwork under the 'Dream Act' August 15, 2012 at the National Immigration Forum in Washington, DC. 
National Journal
Sophie Quinton
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Sophie Quinton
May 5, 2014, 12:04 a.m.

Here’s a roundup of the edu­ca­tion art­icles that caught Next Amer­ica’s eye from April 28 to May 5. All ad­dress trends that par­tic­u­larly af­fect minor­ity stu­dents.

Flor­ida and Vir­gin­ia Give “Dream­ers” a dis­count. Flor­ida’s state Sen­ate has voted to al­low stu­dents who came to the United States il­leg­ally as chil­dren to pay in-state tu­ition at pub­lic uni­versit­ies. It’s likely that the bill will soon re­ceive Gov. Rick Scott’s sig­na­ture. Mean­while, Vir­gin­ia’s at­tor­ney gen­er­al has found that ex­ist­ing law per­mits state col­leges and uni­versit­ies to charge in-state tu­ition for stu­dents who were brought to the U.S. il­leg­ally as chil­dren. Ac­cord­ing to fed­er­al data, more than 8,000 Vir­gin­ia res­id­ents and over 20,500 Flor­ida res­id­ents have been ap­proved for de­ferred ac­tion to date. The Wash­ing­ton Post, The New York Times

The Feds Could Be Do­ing More to Po­lice Cam­pus Sexu­al As­sault. Title IX, a civil-rights law, re­quires col­leges to in­vest­ig­ate and re­solve re­ports of sexu­al as­sault. But between 2003 and 2013, less than one-tenth of stu­dent and alumni com­plaints sub­mit­ted to the Edu­ca­tion De­part­ment led to a form­al agree­ment to change cam­pus policies, ac­cord­ing to The Chron­icle of High­er Edu­ca­tion. Improv­ing clar­ity on the law and im­prov­ing en­force­ment were in­cluded on the White House’s re­cent list of re­com­mend­a­tions for re­du­cing sexu­al as­sault on col­lege cam­puses. The Chron­icle of High­er Edu­ca­tion, Politico

Is There Really a “Boy Crisis”? By kinder­garten, girls are bet­ter be­haved, more per­sist­ent, and more in­de­pend­ent than boys. The gender gap in in be­ha­vi­or­al skills is even great­er than the gap between rich and poor and between some ra­cial groups, The New York Times re­ports. But as Na­tion­al Journ­al’s Bri­an Res­nick points out, the gender gap has been evid­ent in stud­ies of grades and gender for at least 100 years. The New York Times, Na­tion­al Journ­al

Some States Are Still Cut­ting High­er Edu­ca­tion Fund­ing. As the eco­nomy im­proves, state fund­ing for high­er edu­ca­tion is start­ing to re­bound, but eight states are still cut­ting their high­er edu­ca­tion budgets, a re­port from the Cen­ter on Budget and Policy Pri­or­it­ies finds. Fund­ing isn’t back to prere­ces­sion levels: The av­er­age state is spend­ing 23 per­cent less per col­lege stu­dent that it was be­fore the re­ces­sion, and in Ari­zona, Louisi­ana, and South Car­o­lina, fund­ing is down 40 per­cent per stu­dent. The takeaway for stu­dents, ac­cord­ing to Vox: “Don’t ex­pect tu­ition prices to fall.” Vox, Cen­ter on Budget and Policy Pri­or­it­ies

Cali­for­nia Sen­ate Com­mit­tee Wants to Re­store Bi­lin­gual Edu­ca­tion. The Cali­for­nia state Sen­ate’s Edu­ca­tion Com­mit­tee wants to ask Cali­for­nia voters to re­peal Pro­pos­i­tion 227, a 1998 ini­ti­at­ive that re­quires that pub­lic school in­struc­tion be con­duc­ted in Eng­lish. Sup­port­ers ar­gue that the ini­ti­at­ive pre­vents chil­dren from be­com­ing mul­ti­lin­gual. “Not every­body do­ing busi­ness in­ter­na­tion­ally or glob­ally speaks Eng­lish,” state Sen. Ben Hueso, a Demo­crat, told the Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles Times

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