‘Hillbilly Millionaire’ to Plead Guilty in Y-12 Extortion Scheme

Global Security Newswire Staff
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Global Security Newswire Staff
June 18, 2014, 9:09 a.m.

A self-de­scribed “hill­billy mil­lion­aire” has agreed to plead guilty in a scheme to ex­tort money from the com­pany that man­ages the Y-12 nuc­le­ar com­plex.

Adam Win­ters, a re­cent par­ti­cipant in the Bravo Chan­nel’s “Mil­lion­aire Match­maker” show, has form­ally ac­cep­ted a deal to plead guilty to one charge of at­temp­ted ex­tor­tion of Bab­cock and Wil­cox, the gov­ern­ment con­tract­or that op­er­ates the Oak Ridge nuc­le­ar weapons site, the Knoxville News-Sen­tinel re­por­ted on Tues­day.

Un­der the terms of the plea bar­gain, the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment has agreed to not pur­sue a pris­on sen­tence longer than six months.

Win­ters was ap­pre­hen­ded in May after al­legedly de­mand­ing $2.5 mil­lion from an in­di­vidu­al he thought to be a com­pany of­fi­cial but who was ac­tu­ally an un­der­cov­er agent with the En­ergy De­part­ment in­spect­or gen­er­al’s of­fice. Win­ters al­legedly wanted hush money to keep from go­ing pub­lic with what he said were hun­dreds of dec­ades-old slides that de­pic­ted an­im­als be­ing de­lib­er­ately ex­posed to harm­ful ra­di­ation.

In the early 1990s it was widely re­por­ted that some of Win­ters’ re­l­at­ives had sought money from both the me­dia and the gov­ern­ment for a set of 1,200 slides pro­duced as far back as the 1940s. The slides were re­portedly in­ad­vert­ently sold at a sur­plus auc­tion. An En­ergy De­part­ment spokes­man said the agency re­fused to pay money to get the slides back.

Win­ters brought a num­ber of slides to the sting op­er­a­tion when he was ar­res­ted. Court re­cords do not de­scribe ex­actly what was de­pic­ted in the slides.

This past winter, the 25-year-old Ten­ness­ee res­id­ent ap­peared on “Mil­lion­aire Match­maker,” a show that prom­ises to or­gan­ize suc­cess­ful dates for wealthy in­di­vidu­als who say they have dif­fi­culty dat­ing. In a sub­mis­sion video for the show, Win­ters de­scribed him­self as “more soph­ist­ic­ated than the Beverly Hill­bil­lies, just be­cause when I ride a dirt bike, I rock Pra­da and my Ray-bans.”

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