Slideshow

Highlights From Tuesday’s National Journal Events -  PICTURES

Naureen Khan
Sept. 4, 2012, 9:19 a.m.

On the first of­fi­cial day of the Demo­crat­ic Na­tion­al Con­ven­tion, Na­tion­al Journ­al hos­ted a series of events to get the Demo­crat­ic take on many of the top­ics covered dur­ing the Re­pub­lic­an con­ven­tion.

To start, Na­tion­al Journ­al hos­ted a lead­ing group of Demo­crat­ic poll­sters, in­clud­ing Joel Ben­en­son, best known as Barack Obama’s lead poll­ster dur­ing the 2008 cam­paign. The pan­el said that Mitt Rom­ney re­ceived a neg­li­gible bump from the GOP con­ven­tion. But the can­did­ate had re­ceived a small bump among eld­erly white voters as a res­ult of his con­tro­ver­sial wel­fare ad

With polling tech­niques ad­van­cing rap­idly, pan­el­ists said, each cam­paign has lit­er­ally nar­rowed each swing state down to a few house­holds in a couple spe­cif­ic me­dia mar­kets. The concept of a swing “state” is no more.

Re­gard­less, it will be hard for Rom­ney to take the White House without sweep­ing these swing states. There are scen­ari­os, the pan­el­ists agreed, in which Obama could lose Ohio, Inid­ana, North Car­o­lina, and Vir­gin­ia, but still pre­vail in the elec­tion. 

Dur­ing the “Path to Power Lunch­eon,” House Minor­ity Lead­er Nancy Pelosi, D-Cal­if., and Demo­crat­ic Con­necti­c­ut Gov. Dan­nel Mal­loy gave their in­put on what the next four years of a po­ten­tial Obama pres­id­ency would look like. Pelosi also out­lined a scen­ario where the Demo­crats take the 25 seats ne­ces­sary to re­gain con­trol of the House.

In the early af­ter­noon, Na­tion­al Journ­al hos­ted a pan­el of lead­ing journ­al­ists and con­sult­ants who com­pared both can­did­ates and parties. Neera Tanden, pres­id­ent of the Cen­ter for Amer­ic­an Pro­gress, said that the 2012 elec­tion will de­term­ine how we will deal with the so-called fisc­al cliff. The broad out­lines of a “grand bar­gain” are there. It just takes Re­pub­lic­ans agree­ing to some rev­en­ue ad­di­tions. 

CNN’s seni­or polit­ic­al ana­lyst Dav­id Ger­gen had a grim out­look on the com­ing four years. Re­gard­less of who is elec­ted, he said, the next two to four years are go­ing to be “rough.” Oth­ers ad­ded that we may make pro­gress on im­mig­ra­tion re­form, but eco­nom­ic and en­ergy-policy de­cisions will likely re­main elu­sive. 

(Check out Monday’s event high­lights)

National Journal's Major Garett, left, and Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress, right, participate in the Compare the Candidates event  in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. National Journal
From the left: Major Garrett, Jim Kessler of the think tank Third Way, and David Gergen, senior political analyst at CNN, participate in the Compare the Candidates event in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. National Journal
David Gergen, CNBC Chief Washington Correspondent John Harwood and Ron Brownstein, National Journal's political director, speak at the Compare the Candidates event in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4, 2012. National Journal
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (left), D-Calif., talks with Ron Brownstein, National Journal political director, during the Path to Power Luncheon at National Journal and The Atlantic event headquarters in Charlotte, N.C., Sept. 4, 2012. National Journal
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (left), D-Calif., talks to Ron Brownstein, National Journal political director, during the Path to Power Luncheon at National Journal and The Atlantic event headquarters in Charlotte, N.C., Sept. 4. National Journal
Gene Sperling (left), director of the national economic council, talks with Ron Brownstein, National Journal political director, during the Path to Power Luncheon in Charlotte, N.C., Sept. 4. Sperling condoned Paul Ryan's budget plan and said Republicans' "ideological resistance" is derailing a budget solution.  National Journal
(From left) Democratic Governor Dan Malloy of Connecticut, Melody Barnes, former director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, and Major Garrett, National Journal chief White House correspondent, participate in the Path to Power Luncheon in Charlotte, N.C., Sept. 4. National Journal
(From left) Ron Fournier, National Journal editor in chief, and Bill Plante, CBS News, ask questions of Joel Benenson, Democratic National Committee pollster, during the National Journal and The Atlantic Daily Briefing in Charlotte, N.C., Sept. 4. The panel discussed evolving polling strategy and which areas campaigns were targeting.  National Journal
Fournier (left) interviews Benenson during the Daily Briefing on Sept. 4. Benenson said that his polling has showed the controversial Republican ad attacking President Obama's welfare record is not moving white voters away from Obama. National Journal
(From left) Margie Omero, founder of Momentum Analysis, John Anzalone, partner at Anzalone Liszt Research, Celinda Lake, president of Lake Research Partners, Beth Reinhard, National Journal political correspondent, and Ron Fournier, National Journal editor in chief, are the second panel during the Daily Briefing at National Journal and The Atlantic event headquarters in Charlotte, N.C., Sept. 4. National Journal
Celinda Lake (right) said she had seen some evidence that the Romney welfare attack ad had actually moved pockets of white, elderly voters away from Obama. John Anzalone looks on. National Journal
General consensus among panelists was that the Romney campaign was attempting to tap into racial fears with the welfare ad. The panel of pollsters also agreed that micro-targeting is getting so specific that swing states are coming down to a few select voters in a few targeted media markets. National Journal
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