Slideshow

101 Years of the Lincoln Memorial

In honor of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, we take a look at the monument-turned-landmark that was built for him.

Feb. 12, 2015, 6:04 a.m.

On Feb­ru­ary 12, 1914, Ab­ra­ham Lin­coln’s 105th birth­day, the Lin­coln Me­mori­al Con­struc­tion Ded­ic­a­tion Ce­re­mony was con­duc­ted in hon­or of the 16th pres­id­ent of the United States. One hun­dred and one years later, the monu­ment is a ma­jor tour­ist at­trac­tion and a civil rights sym­bol. 

West Potomac Park circa 1912, prior to construction of the Lincoln Memorial. National Journal
The Lincoln Memorial under construction in 1915. National Journal
The Lincoln Memorial under construction in 1915. National Journal
A view from the air of the Lincoln Memorial under construction, in 1919. National Journal
The Lincoln Memorial Bridge under construction, with the Washington Memorial in the background, some time between 1905 and 1945. National Journal
The statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial undergoes installation around 1920 in Washington, D.C. National Journal
A statue of Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865), the 16th President of the United States of America, and an inscription to his memory, circa 1930. National Journal
President of the United States Warren G. Harding speaks at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial on May 30, 1922.  National Journal
An army blimp seated next to the Lincoln Memorial, circa 1920-1950. National Journal
Crowds gather outside the Lincoln Memorial for a Memorial Day dedication in 1922 in Washington, D.C. National Journal
President Franklin Roosevelt pays homage to the memory of the 16th President at the Lincoln Memorial, on Lincoln's birthday on February 12, 1938. With him, from left to right: Diane Hopkins, daughter of WPA Administrator Harry Hopkins; First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt; Chandler Roosevelt, their granddaughter; President Roosevelt; the President's Naval aide, Captain W. B. Woodson; and his Military aide, Col. Edwin Watson. National Journal
The statue of Abraham Lincoln is illuminated during a civil rights rally August 28, 1963 in Washington, D.C. National Journal
Civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., waves to supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963, on The Mall in Washington, DC, during the "March on Washington" where King delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech, which is credited with mobilizing supporters of desegregation and prompted the 1964 Civil Rights Act. National Journal
Marlon Brando (1924 - 2004) stands with his arm around poet James Baldwin, surrounded by actors Charlton Heston (left), Harry Belafonte and others gathered at the Lincoln Memorial during the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963. National Journal
An engraving at the Lincoln Memorial marks the spot where Martin Luther King, Jr. made his 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech. National Journal
Coretta Scott King, civil rights leader Martin Luther King's widow, delivers a speech at Lincoln Memorial, at the end of the Poor People March, on June 19, 1968, in Washington, D.C. The Poor People's Campaign was organized in 1968 by Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) to demand economic aid to the poorest communities of the United States. After King's assassination in April 1968, SCLC decided to go on with the campaign under the leadership of Ralph Abernathy, SCLC's new president. National Journal
An unidentified National Park Service worker cleans the statue of Abraham Lincoln on October 25, 1995, as part of the annual cleaning of the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. National Journal
President-elect Barack Obama speaks in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the "We Are One: The Obama Inaugural Celebration At The Lincoln Memorial" on January 18, 2009 at the National Mall in Washington, DC. National Journal
The statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial, as it sits today. The inscription behind him reads, "In this temple/ As in the hearts of the people/ For whom he saved the Union/ The memory of Abraham Lincoln/ Is enshrined forever."  National Journal
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