The Most Powerful Women in the World

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Jan. 6, 2014, 3:55 p.m.

Win­ning isn’t al­ways a good thing, even when that thing hap­pens to be the No­bel Peace Prize.

— Noth­ing gets GOP par­tis­ans more en­raged than watch­ing Pres. Obama use his rhet­or­ic­al skills to post a win. It’s one thing to win an elec­tion after spend­ing less than 4 yrs. in the Sen­ate, but win­ning a No­bel after just 8 mos. in of­fice?

— Some of the harshest rhet­or­ic came from the RNC. In a state­ment, Steele not only re­fused to con­grat­u­late Obama, but he said it was “un­for­tu­nate” that Obama’s “star power has out­shined tire­less ad­voc­ates who have made real achieve­ments work­ing to­wards peace and hu­man rights.” GOP Rep./ SC GOV cand. Bar­rett writes “fol­low­ing in the foot­steps of Jimmy Carter is not where Amer­ica needs to go.”

— Obama’s Rose Garden speech this a.m. was de­signed to dis­play some mod­esty. He said the chal­lenges con­front­ing the world “can’t be met by one per­son or one na­tion alone.” Yet, it’s hard to be­lieve this will be enough to cool the at­tacks.

— Mean­while, a No­bel Prize won’t mean much to Sen­ate Dems wor­ried about the per­ils of a vot­ing for an en­ergy/cli­mate or health care bill. And it only seems to add one more com­plic­a­tion to Obama’s cal­cu­la­tion about send­ing more troops to Afgh­anistan.

— The irony: A peace prize is only help­ing to widen the par­tis­an chasm at home.

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