SPOTLIGHT

PACs Flock to New House Majority Whip Steve Scalise

Rep. Steve Scalise
National Journal
Scott Bland
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Scott Bland
July 18, 2014, 7:45 a.m.

Battle­ground can­did­ates at­tract most of the at­ten­tion when FEC fil­ing time rolls around, but make sure to check out House Ma­jor­ity Whip-elect Steve Scal­ise‘s latest re­port, which de­tails the path to power in­side the Cap­it­ol. — Scal­ise raised and spent more money in the second quarter, around $350,000 each, than in any quarter since 2008, the year of his first elec­tion to Con­gress. Out­go­ing House Ma­jor­ity Lead­er Eric Can­tor sparked the flow of money with his June 10 primary loss; after that, Scal­ise’s cam­paign com­mit­tee went in­to ac­tion as part of his lead­er­ship cam­paign. — Scal­ise’s cam­paign com­mit­tee gave $30,000 to 14 dif­fer­ent Re­pub­lic­an mem­bers, in­clud­ing Can­tor, after Can­tor’s loss, and Scal­ise spent a com­par­able sum on din­ner meet­ings in that time. The souven­ir base­ball bats Scal­ise gave his cam­paign team also ap­pear in the FEC re­port. But the really in­ter­est­ing re­la­tion between Scal­ise’s cam­paign ac­count and lead­er­ship race comes on the fun­drais­ing side, not the spend­ing side. — Over $122,000 came in­to Scal­ise’s cam­paign ac­count from 64 dif­fer­ent PACs on the last day of the second quarter, after Scal­ise had se­cured the whip po­s­i­tion. Around than 20 of them had nev­er be­fore giv­en to Scal­ise dur­ing his three-plus terms in Con­gress. We’re bet­ting that we’ll see plenty more groups join those new friends in the next FEC re­port from Ju­ly through Septem­ber, Scal­ise’s first full quarter as an in­com­ing mem­ber of GOP lead­er­ship and then, after Ju­ly 31, the ma­jor­ity whip him­self.— Scott Bland

COR­REC­TION: A pre­vi­ous ver­sion of this story misid­en­ti­fied PACs that had pre­vi­ously giv­en to Scal­ise.

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