What the Religious Right Thinks of Republicans' New Birth Control Platform

A strategy intended to appeal to women voters has alienated members of the GOP.

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 25: Margot Riphagen of New Orleans dresses as a birth control pill pack while dancing in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during oral arguments in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby March 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. The court heard from lawyers on both sides of Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby, a case that may determine whether the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 allows a for-profit corporation to deny its employees the health coverage of contraceptives to which the employees are otherwise entitled by federal law, based on the religious objections of the corporation's owners. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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