Which Countries Get the Best Deals Out Of the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

Vietnam is a clear winner. The United States? Not so much.

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Libby Isenstein
April 28, 2015, 8:08 a.m.

This week, the Sen­ate is set to de­bate a meas­ure that would “fast-track” ne­go­ti­ations on the White House-backed Trans-Pa­cific Part­ner­shipThis pro­posed part­ner­ship has di­vided Wash­ing­ton in an un­usu­al way. Con­gres­sion­al Re­pub­lic­ans and cor­por­ate lob­by­ists have joined the pres­id­ent in sup­port­ing the trade agree­ment, while many Demo­crats and a wide range of act­iv­ist groups have come out against. 

The chart be­low breaks down just how the pro­posed part­ner­ship would im­pact the coun­tries in­volved, based on es­tim­ates from the Peterson In­sti­tute for In­ter­na­tion­al Eco­nom­ics. Vi­et­nam is in the best po­s­i­tion of the 12 na­tions, poised to see a $46 bil­lion bump in GDP by 2025, an ad­di­tion­al 13.6 per­cent of the baseline GDP pro­jec­ted for that year without the TPP.

This story was up­dated on May 11, 2015.

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