National Journal Debuts Redesigned Magazine

Redesign Marks Next Phase in Reimagining of Larger National Journal Brand

National Journal
See more stories about...
June 20, 2014, 6:46 a.m.

Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (June 19, 2014) - Na­tion­al Journal today de­buts the re­design of its flag­ship magazine, which has been re­in­ven­ted as Wash­ing­ton’s defin­it­ive magazine of story-telling about polit­ics, policy, gov­ern­ment, and ideas for those liv­ing and work­ing in­side as well as out­side the na­tion’s cap­it­al. Un­der the lead­er­ship of ed­it­or Richard Just, the re­design of the 45-year-old pub­lic­a­tion is the next phase in a lar­ger re­ima­gin­ing of the Na­tion­al Journ­al brand, which began last Oc­to­ber with the suc­cess­ful re­launch of the web­site. Since then read­er­ship has in­creased; for 2014 year to date, web­site traffic is up 57%, mo­bile us­age has grown 20%, and there has been a year over year 118% growth in rev­en­ue. The in­aug­ur­al is­sue, avail­able today to sub­scribers and Na­tion­al Journ­al mem­bers, takes a com­pre­hens­ive look ahead at the 2016 pres­id­en­tial race — the con­tenders and the people and is­sues be­hind them.

“In re-en­vi­sion­ing the magazine, we built on Na­tion­al Journ­al‘s found­a­tion of non-par­tis­an in­tel­li­gent re­port­ing and ana­lys­is to come up with a product that em­phas­izes deeply re­por­ted long-form journ­al­ism through com­pel­ling char­ac­ter-driv­en nar­rat­ives about Wash­ing­ton and the world of polit­ics — for thought lead­ers throughout the coun­try,” said Just.

Just de­scribes this vis­ion in a let­ter from the ed­it­or fea­tured in the magazine and on­line at: ht­tp://www.na­tion­al­journ­al.com/magazine/ed­it­or-s-note-about-the-re­designed-na­tion­al-journ­al-magazine-20140618.

“We have taken a new ap­proach to how we cov­er Wash­ing­ton both di­git­ally and in print,” said Ed­it­or-in-Chief Tim Grieve. “In the fall, we were fo­cused on grow­ing our di­git­al pres­ence. Now we are turn­ing to the magazine to provide our audi­ence with in-depth, well-writ­ten stor­ies that cov­er this city in a way that no one else does.”

In ad­di­tion to bol­ster­ing the magazine’s long-form re­port­ing, Just has up­dated the format and in­tro­duced new fea­tures in­clud­ing:

  • The In­ner Loop ““ A front of the book sec­tion fea­tur­ing fun-to-read short nar­rat­ives about DC and the world of polit­ics.
  • Hy­per­loc­al ““ This fea­ture, writ­ten on the ground by loc­al journ­al­ists, looks at how polit­ic­al con­tro­ver­sies are play­ing out in spe­cif­ic towns and com­munit­ies across the coun­try.
  • One Good Idea ““ Ex­plores smart, in­nov­at­ive policy ideas be­ing gen­er­ated by wonks that aren’t ne­ces­sar­ily get­ting the at­ten­tion they should.
  • One Good Book ““ Takes a look at new polit­ic­al books — and the ideas in them — that may not have got­ten the at­ten­tion they de­serve.
  • First-Per­son ““ A guest column from those who have worked in polit­ics and policy that of­fers an hon­est look at Wash­ing­ton — from those who know the city best.
  • Tac­tics ““ A back of the book fea­ture that uses sur­vey data com­piled by Na­tion­al Journ­al’s re­search di­vi­sion to ex­plain how Wash­ing­ton really works.
  • One Good Chart ““ In each is­sue, this back­page fea­ture will tell a story about the world of polit­ics or DC us­ing a com­pel­ling graph­ic.

Just, who joined the magazine in March, has ex­pan­ded the pub­lic­a­tion’s masthead with new tal­ent, in­clud­ing man­aging ed­it­or Aman­da Cormi­er and writers and con­trib­ut­ors Michelle Cottle, Nora Ca­plan-Brick­er, Eth­an Ep­stein, Si­mon Van Zuylen-Wood, and Daniel Lib­it. They joined those who were already part of Na­tion­al Journ­al, in­clud­ing deputy ed­it­or An­die Coller and magazine writers Tim Al­berta, Peter Bein­art, Mar­in Cogan, Shane Gold­mach­er, and Alex Seitz-Wald.

De­sign­er Joe Heroun was re­spons­ible for trans­form­ing the look of the magazine. Un­der Heroun’s art dir­ec­tion, the first is­sue fea­tures strik­ing pho­to­graphy and ori­gin­al art to com­ple­ment the writ­ing. The first new cov­er, which de­picts the long road to the White House, is the work of design firm Heads of State, and fits with the magazine’s great­er fo­cus on beau­ti­ful ori­gin­al art­work, both il­lus­tra­tions and pho­to­graphy.

Mean­while, Na­tion­al Journ­al design dir­ect­or Jenny Mazer has cre­ated a new format for present­ing magazine pieces on the web — an el­eg­ant new tem­plate that fea­tures a par­al­lax treat­ment with big, bold pho­to­graphy and storytelling tools to be used with all fea­ture magazine pieces. The tem­plate also brings with it a new im­pact­ful space for ad­vert­ising that in­cludes a Rising Star Bill­board unit for en­hanced en­gage­ment with read­ers.

Fea­ture pieces in the new is­sue in­clude: Peter Bein­art’s fore­cast of what a Hil­lary Clin­ton pres­id­ency would look like; Tim Al­berta’s pro­file of Gov. Scott Walk­er, which ex­plains why he may be a for­mid­able con­tender in 2016; Mar­in Cogan’s re­veal­ing pro­file of former Gov. Bri­an Sch­weitzer; Wash­ing­ton Post colum­nist Mi­chael Ger­son on the fu­ture of Re­pub­lic­an for­eign policy; Si­mon van Zuylen-Wood on Bernie Sanders and the fu­ture of the Demo­crat­ic Party’s left wing; and Shane Gold­mach­er on Nate Mor­ris, a key ad­viser to Rand Paul.

In ad­di­tion to re­fresh­ing its vari­ous plat­forms over the last sev­er­al months, the brand went through a lead­er­ship change in March when Tim Hart­man was named CEO of the lar­ger Na­tion­al Journ­al Group and Pub­lish­er Poppy Mac­Don­ald and Ed­it­or in Chief Tim Grieve were each named Pres­id­ent.

The new print magazine is avail­able now to Na­tion­al Journ­al mem­bers and sub­scribers and on­line at Na­tion­al­Journ­al.com.

10 Ways the Re­designed Na­tion­al Journ­al Ig­nited the Con­ver­sa­tion

Mar­in Cogan’s pro­file of former Montana Gov­ernor Bri­an Sch­weitzer ig­nited a me­dia firestorm — here’s MS­N­BC’s Rachel Mad­dow dis­cuss­ing Cogan’s piece “The Gonzo Op­tion.” {{third­PartyEmbed type:ms­n­bcvideos id:n_mad­dow_d­b­lock­_140619}} The Sch­weitzer piece led The Daily Beast’s weekly list of the best lon­greads on­line (read it here)


Na­tion­al Journ­al Ed­it­or Richard Just pre­viewed the new is­sue’s broad­er out­look for the 2016 race for MS­N­BC’s “The Cycle”

{{third­PartyEmbed type:ms­n­bcvideos id:n_­cycle_bri­an1_200614}}

Ed­it­or-in-Chief Tim Grieve dis­cusses the new magazine in Cap­it­al New York‘s “60-Second In­ter­view”


Poynter high­lighted the re­designed magazine’s six long-form fea­tures (read it here)


Di­gi­day re­por­ted on Na­tion­al Journ­al’s ap­proach to long-form con­tent on­line (read it here)


Hun­dreds of Cap­it­ol Hill staffers joined Na­tion­al Journ­al to cel­eb­rate the re­design over break­fast (see Fish­bowlDC’s re-cap here)

Na­tion­al Journ­al cel­eb­rated with DC in­flu­en­tials over cock­tails at Bras­ser­ie Beck on K Street

Fo­lio re­por­ted on Na­tion­al Journ­al’s totally re­designed concept to co­in­cide with its new dir­ec­tion (read it here)


10 Ways the Redesigned <em>National Journal</em> Ignited the Conversation

Mar­in Cogan’s pro­file of former Montana Gov­ernor Bri­an Sch­weitzer ig­nited a me­dia firestorm — here’s MS­N­BC’s Rachel Mad­dow dis­cuss­ing Cogan’s piece “The Gonzo Op­tion.”

{{third­PartyEmbed type:ms­n­bcvideos id:n_mad­dow_d­b­lock­_140619}}

The Sch­weitzer piece led The Daily Beast’s weekly list of the best lon­greads on­line (read it here)


Na­tion­al Journ­al Ed­it­or Richard Just pre­viewed the new is­sue’s broad­er out­look for the 2016 race for MS­N­BC’s “The Cycle”

{{third­PartyEmbed type:ms­n­bcvideos id:n_­cycle_bri­an1_200614}}

Ed­it­or-in-Chief Tim Grieve dis­cusses the new magazine in Cap­it­al New York‘s “60-Second In­ter­view”


Poynter high­lighted the re­designed magazine’s six long-form fea­tures (read it here)


Di­gi­day re­por­ted on Na­tion­al Journ­al’s ap­proach to long-form con­tent on­line (read it here)


Hun­dreds of Cap­it­ol Hill staffers joined Na­tion­al Journ­al to cel­eb­rate the re­design over break­fast (see Fish­bowlDC’s re-cap here)

Na­tion­al Journ­al cel­eb­rated with DC in­flu­en­tials over cock­tails at Bras­ser­ie Beck on K Street

Fo­lio re­por­ted on Na­tion­al Journ­al’s totally re­designed concept to co­in­cide with its new dir­ec­tion (read it here)


What We're Following See More »
A DARK CLOUD OVER TRUMP?
Snowstorm Could Impact Primary Turnout
2 days ago
THE LATEST

A snowstorm is supposed to hit New Hampshire today and “linger into Primary Tuesday.” GOP consultant Ron Kaufman said lower turnout should help candidates who have spent a lot of time in the state tending to retail politicking. Donald Trump “has acknowledged that he needs to step up his ground-game, and a heavy snowfall could depress his figures relative to more organized candidates.”

Source:
IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
A Shake-Up in the Offing in the Clinton Camp?
2 days ago
THE DETAILS

Anticipating a primary loss in New Hampshire on Tuesday, Hillary and Bill Clinton “are considering staffing and strategy changes” to their campaign. Sources tell Politico that the Clintons are likely to layer over top officials with experienced talent, rather than fire their staff en masse.

Source:
THE LAST ROUND OF NEW HAMPSHIRE POLLS
Trump Is Still Ahead, but Who’s in Second?
1 days ago
THE LATEST

We may not be talking about New Hampshire primary polls for another three-and-a-half years, so here goes:

  • American Research Group’s tracking poll has Donald Trump in the lead with 30% support, followed by Marco Rubio and John Kasich tying for second place at 16%. On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders leads Hillary Clinton 53%-41%.
  • The 7 News/UMass Lowell tracking poll has Trump way out front with 34%, followed by Rubio and Ted Cruz with 13% apiece. Among the Democrats, Sanders is in front 56%-40%.
  • A Gravis poll puts Trump ahead with 28%, followed by Kasich with 17% and Rubio with 15%.
IT’S ALL ABOUT SECOND PLACE
CNN Calls the Primary for Sanders and Trump
1 days ago
THE LATEST

Well that didn’t take long. CNN has already declared Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump the winners of the New Hampshire primary, leaving the rest of the candidates to fight for the scraps. Five minutes later, the Associated Press echoed CNN’s call.

Source:
×