Rob Ford Is the Next Big Cartoon Star

And he’s even better than Homer Simpson.

National Journal
Reena Flores
April 2, 2014, 10:46 a.m.

The non­profit group No Ford Na­tion wants someone — any­one — elec­ted as the new may­or of Toronto. Their only re­quire­ment? That hizzo­n­er’s name doesn’t start with “R” and end in “ob Ford.”

And as if the Ca­na­dian politi­cian’s saga wasn’t comed­ic enough, Rob Ford is now the star of No Ford Na­tion’s an­im­ated Web video series, which at­tempts to dash any of the man’s fu­ture polit­ic­al as­pir­a­tions.

The Toronto May­or Show is a three-part video cam­paign re­mind­ing Toronto voters of all Ford’s past sins. And the goal, ac­cord­ing to No Ford Na­tion founder Christina Robins, is to “shock” Toronto voters in­to in­form­ing them­selves about the up­com­ing elec­tion’s oth­er can­did­ates.

The group cre­ated the car­toons us­ing ac­tu­al sound­bites from Ford’s press con­fer­ences and pub­lic ap­pear­ances to voice over ori­gin­al an­im­a­tions. “The best way to shock them was to use the may­or’s own words,” said Robins.

Robins wanted to make him “in­to a Homer Simpson char­ac­ter to high­light how ri­dicu­lous it is that he’s run­ning for reelec­tion.”

And thus The Toronto May­or Show was born.

The first epis­ode, titled “Crack,” is an au­dio com­pos­ite from two of Ford’s press con­fer­ences: First, his deni­al of drug use, fol­lowed by his hes­it­ant ad­mis­sion a few months later that “Yes, I have smoked crack co­caine.”

It makes for comed­ic gold:

The non­profit group No Ford Na­tion wants someone — any­one — elec­ted as the new may­or of Toronto. Their only re­quire­ment? That hizzo­n­er’s name doesn’t start with “R” and end in “ob Ford.”

And as if the Ca­na­dian politi­cian’s saga wasn’t comed­ic enough, Rob Ford is now the star of No Ford Na­tion’s an­im­ated Web video series, which at­tempts to dash any of the man’s fu­ture polit­ic­al as­pir­a­tions.

The Toronto May­or Show is a three-part video cam­paign re­mind­ing Toronto voters of all Ford’s past sins. And the goal, ac­cord­ing to No Ford Na­tion founder Christina Robins, is to “shock” Toronto voters in­to in­form­ing them­selves about the up­com­ing elec­tion’s oth­er can­did­ates.

The group cre­ated the car­toons us­ing ac­tu­al sound­bites from Ford’s press con­fer­ences and pub­lic ap­pear­ances to voice over ori­gin­al an­im­a­tions. “The best way to shock them was to use the may­or’s own words,” said Robins.

Robins wanted to make him “in­to a Homer Simpson char­ac­ter to high­light how ri­dicu­lous it is that he’s run­ning for reelec­tion.”

And thus The Toronto May­or Show was born.

The first epis­ode, titled “Crack,” is an au­dio com­pos­ite from two of Ford’s press con­fer­ences: First, his deni­al of drug use, fol­lowed by his hes­it­ant ad­mis­sion a few months later that “Yes, I have smoked crack co­caine.”

It makes for comed­ic gold:

And for the second epis­ode, “Enough to Eat,” you might want to put some head­phones in — we hear a few of Ford’s choice NS­FW words to re­port­ers.

The non­profit group No Ford Na­tion wants someone — any­one — elec­ted as the new may­or of Toronto. Their only re­quire­ment? That hizzo­n­er’s name doesn’t start with “R” and end in “ob Ford.”

And as if the Ca­na­dian politi­cian’s saga wasn’t comed­ic enough, Rob Ford is now the star of No Ford Na­tion’s an­im­ated Web video series, which at­tempts to dash any of the man’s fu­ture polit­ic­al as­pir­a­tions.

The Toronto May­or Show is a three-part video cam­paign re­mind­ing Toronto voters of all Ford’s past sins. And the goal, ac­cord­ing to No Ford Na­tion founder Christina Robins, is to “shock” Toronto voters in­to in­form­ing them­selves about the up­com­ing elec­tion’s oth­er can­did­ates.

The group cre­ated the car­toons us­ing ac­tu­al sound­bites from Ford’s press con­fer­ences and pub­lic ap­pear­ances to voice over ori­gin­al an­im­a­tions. “The best way to shock them was to use the may­or’s own words,” said Robins.

Robins wanted to make him “in­to a Homer Simpson char­ac­ter to high­light how ri­dicu­lous it is that he’s run­ning for reelec­tion.”

And thus The Toronto May­or Show was born.

The first epis­ode, titled “Crack,” is an au­dio com­pos­ite from two of Ford’s press con­fer­ences: First, his deni­al of drug use, fol­lowed by his hes­it­ant ad­mis­sion a few months later that “Yes, I have smoked crack co­caine.”

It makes for comed­ic gold:

And for the second epis­ode, “Enough to Eat,” you might want to put some head­phones in — we hear a few of Ford’s choice NS­FW words to re­port­ers.

But the group’s an­im­ated geni­us cul­min­ates in its third epis­ode, “Night Out,” star­ring a Rasta­far­i­an, auto-tuned ca­ri­ca­ture of the Toronto politi­cian whose voice was taken from a Janu­ary 20th re­cord­ing

The non­profit group No Ford Na­tion wants someone — any­one — elec­ted as the new may­or of Toronto. Their only re­quire­ment? That hizzo­n­er’s name doesn’t start with “R” and end in “ob Ford.”

And as if the Ca­na­dian politi­cian’s saga wasn’t comed­ic enough, Rob Ford is now the star of No Ford Na­tion’s an­im­ated Web video series, which at­tempts to dash any of the man’s fu­ture polit­ic­al as­pir­a­tions.

The Toronto May­or Show is a three-part video cam­paign re­mind­ing Toronto voters of all Ford’s past sins. And the goal, ac­cord­ing to No Ford Na­tion founder Christina Robins, is to “shock” Toronto voters in­to in­form­ing them­selves about the up­com­ing elec­tion’s oth­er can­did­ates.

The group cre­ated the car­toons us­ing ac­tu­al sound­bites from Ford’s press con­fer­ences and pub­lic ap­pear­ances to voice over ori­gin­al an­im­a­tions. “The best way to shock them was to use the may­or’s own words,” said Robins.

Robins wanted to make him “in­to a Homer Simpson char­ac­ter to high­light how ri­dicu­lous it is that he’s run­ning for reelec­tion.”

And thus The Toronto May­or Show was born.

The first epis­ode, titled “Crack,” is an au­dio com­pos­ite from two of Ford’s press con­fer­ences: First, his deni­al of drug use, fol­lowed by his hes­it­ant ad­mis­sion a few months later that “Yes, I have smoked crack co­caine.”

It makes for comed­ic gold:

And for the second epis­ode, “Enough to Eat,” you might want to put some head­phones in — we hear a few of Ford’s choice NS­FW words to re­port­ers.

But the group’s an­im­ated geni­us cul­min­ates in its third epis­ode, “Night Out,” star­ring a Rasta­far­i­an, auto-tuned ca­ri­ca­ture of the Toronto politi­cian whose voice was taken from a Janu­ary 20th re­cord­ing

No Ford Na­tion began its cam­paign with signs in Toronto, to wide­spread In­ter­net ac­claim: “When I ur­in­ate in pub­lic, I nev­er get caught on cam­era,” reads one mem­or­able slo­gan. “He prom­ises to just smoke pot as may­or. Not crack,” reads an­oth­er. 

The pop­ular­ity of their cam­paign ma­ter­i­als spurred the anti-Ford group to move fast in­to Web video ter­rit­ory. But if you’re look­ing for more, you might be out of luck: The group has no cur­rent plans to con­tin­ue the series.

While there are no guar­an­tees of an­oth­er car­toon, Robins held out some hope: “If he says something out­rageous be­fore the elec­tion, maybe we’ll pro­duce an­oth­er epis­ode.”

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