Insurance Helps Young People Detect Cancer in Time”“Study

Researchers find young people without coverage are more likely to get advanced cancer diagnoses.

PANORAMA CITY, CA - JANUARY 28: Dr. Jason Greenspan (L) and emergency room nurse Junizar Manansala care for a patient in the ER of Mission Community Hospital where doctors held a press conference outside on a class action lawsuit against the state of California by a coalition of emergency room physicians claiming that without additional funding, the entire emergency healthcare system is on the verge of collapse on January 28, 2009 in Panorama City, California. According to the coalition, the cost of providing emergency room treatment has nearly doubled over the past decade and patient load increased by more than 28 percent while Medi-Cal reimbursements have remained largely unchanged. During that time, 85 California hospitals in California have closed and an additional 55 facilities have shut down their emergency rooms. California now reportedly ranks worst in the nation for access emergency care and last in emergency rooms per capita. California has seven emergency rooms per million people while the national average is 20 emergency rooms per million people. 
National Journal
Clara Ritger
Feb. 25, 2014, 12:05 a.m.

Health in­sur­ance is key to de­tect­ing can­cer be­fore it’s too late, even among young people.

That’s the con­clu­sion of a new Amer­ic­an Can­cer So­ci­ety study that found un­in­sured young adults are up to twice as likely to get late-stage can­cer dia­gnoses than their peers with private in­sur­ance.

The ACS sampled roughly 260,000 Amer­ic­ans ages 15 to 39 who were dia­gnosed with can­cer between 2004 and 2010.

Among the sample, wo­men without in­sur­ance were nearly twice as likely as those with private in­sur­ance to get late-stage dia­gnoses, while un­in­sured men were 1.5 times as likely to re­ceive late-stage can­cer dia­gnoses as their privately in­sured peers. Pa­tients who re­ceive late-stage can­cer dia­gnos­is — ones in which the can­cer is de­tec­ted only after it has spread to mul­tiple parts of the body — are less likely to sur­vive than those who are dia­gnosed earli­er.

Pub­lic-policy ini­ti­at­ives to ex­pand ac­cess to and re­duce the cost of health in­sur­ance — such as the Af­ford­able Care Act — could save lives as can­cer is iden­ti­fied and treated earli­er for newly in­sured pa­tients, ACS re­search­ers ar­gue.

“The Af­ford­able Care Act, with its fo­cus on in­creas­ing private in­sur­ance cov­er­age of young adults and provid­ing cer­tain can­cer screen­ings at no cost to pa­tients, has the po­ten­tial to make a big im­pact on this age group,” ACS Dir­ect­or of Health Ser­vices Re­search An­thony Rob­bins said in a press re­lease. Rob­bins is the lead au­thor of the study.

Un­in­sured pa­tients were young­er, more likely to be male, more likely to be black or His­pan­ic, and more likely to reside in the South, ac­cord­ing to the study. The re­search­ers also found that minor­it­ies were more likely to have ad­vanced can­cer at the time of dia­gnos­is.

While hav­ing private in­sur­ance in­creased the like­li­hood that can­cer would be caught early, Medi­care and Medi­caid pa­tients were found to have about the same res­ults as un­in­sured pa­tients, troub­ling stat­ist­ics for poli­cy­makers as they look to ex­pand ac­cess to the pro­grams across the coun­try. More re­search must be done to con­firm those find­ings, the ACS said, as some pa­tients be­come newly and ret­ro­act­ively eli­gible for those pro­grams be­cause of a can­cer dia­gnos­is.

The find­ings are con­sist­ent with pri­or ACS re­search on the link between in­sur­ance status and can­cer dia­gnoses, which has found that pa­tients without in­sur­ance have a high­er like­li­hood of ad­vanced can­cer dia­gnos­is among the whole adult pop­u­la­tion and high­er like­li­hood of ad­vanced breast can­cer among wo­men.

What We're Following See More »
IN ADDITION TO DNC AND DCCC
Clinton Campaign Also Hacked
5 hours ago
THE LATEST
1.5 MILLION MORE TUNED IN FOR TRUMP
More People Watched Trump’s Acceptance Speech
5 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Hillary Clinton hopes that television ratings for the candidates' acceptance speeches at their respective conventions aren't foreshadowing of similar results at the polls in November. Preliminary results from the networks and cable channels show that 34.9 million people tuned in for Donald Trump's acceptance speech while 33.3 million watched Clinton accept the Democratic nomination. However, it is still possible that the numbers are closer than these ratings suggest: the numbers don't include ratings from PBS or CSPAN, which tend to attract more Democratic viewers.

Source:
AFFECTS NOVEMBER ELECTIONS
North Carolina Voter ID Law Struck Down
8 hours ago
THE DETAILS

The US Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday overturned North Carolina's 2013 voter ID law, saying it was passed with “discriminatory intent." The decision sends the case back to the district judge who initially dismissed challenges to the law. "The ruling prohibits North Carolina from requiring photo identification from voters in future elections, including the November 2016 general election, restores a week of early voting and preregistration for 16- and 17-year-olds, and ensures that same-day registration and out-of-precinct voting will remain in effect."

Source:
NORTH DAKOTA TO ILLINOIS
Massive Oil Pipeline Approved for the Midwest
9 hours ago
THE DETAILS

An oil pipeline almost as long as the much-debated Keystone XL has won final approval to transport crude from North Dakota to Illinois, traveling through South Dakota and Iowa along the way. "The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave the final blessing to the Dakota Access pipeline on Tuesday. Developers now have the last set of permits they need to build through the small portion of federal land the line crosses, which includes major waterways like the Mississippi and the Missouri rivers. The so-called Bakken pipeline goes through mostly state and private land."

Source:
DISAPPOINTING RESULTS
GDP Grew at 1.2% in Q2
10 hours ago
THE DETAILS

The U.S. economy grew at an anemic 1.2% in the second quarter, "well below the 2.6% growth economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal had forecast." Consumer spending was "robust," but it was offset by "cautious" business investment. "Since the recession ended seven years ago, the expansion has failed to achieve the breakout growth seen in past recoveries. "The average annual growth rate during the current business cycle, 2.1%, remains the weakest of any expansion since at least 1949."

Source:
×