Shaheen Fights to Recharge Energy-Efficiency Bill

WASHINGTON - JANUARY 27: NARAL Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) speaks at a luncheon to mark the 36th anniversary of Roe v. Wade on January 27, 2009 in Washington, DC. The lunch, hosted by NARAL Pro-Choice America, was held to celebrate the Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion. 
National Journal
Clare Foran
Dec. 17, 2013, 7:14 a.m.

With law­makers join­ing hands to pass a budget deal, could there be a push to ad­vance oth­er, less con­tro­ver­sial bi­par­tis­an bills?

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., the au­thor of an em­battled en­ergy-ef­fi­ciency bill, cer­tainly hopes so. 

“I’m op­tim­ist­ic that we can find a way for­ward,” Shaheen told Na­tion­al Journ­al in the Cap­it­ol on Tues­day, when asked about the status of the le­gis­la­tion.

Des­pite the fact that the meas­ure, which Shaheen co­sponsored with Sen. Rob Port­man, R-Ohio, has wide bi­par­tis­an sup­port, its pro­gress stalled in the fall when it be­came mired down in de­bate over the Af­ford­able Care Act and oth­er hot-but­ton is­sues un­re­lated to the le­gis­la­tion it­self. The bill con­tains in­cent­ives to speed ad­op­tion of en­ergy-ef­fi­cient tech­no­lo­gies in the com­mer­cial, res­id­en­tial, and in­dus­tri­al sec­tors as well as by the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment.

Shaheen and Port­man, along with their staffers, have been work­ing be­hind the scenes for the past few months, however, to win enough votes to in­voke clo­ture in the Sen­ate to cut off de­bate when the le­gis­la­tion is re­in­tro­duced.

That work, Shaheen said, is on­go­ing.

“We’ve se­cured a num­ber of votes,” she said. “And we’re work­ing on se­cur­ing a few more.”

Shaheen said that while she does not yet know when the le­gis­la­tion might be taken up again by the full Sen­ate, she is hop­ing to make an an­nounce­ment with Port­man on the Sen­ate floor this week re­gard­ing the meas­ure.

A Sen­ate aide said the an­nounce­ment has not yet been sched­uled but that the sen­at­or is hop­ing to high­light the pro­gress that’s been made to ad­vance the bill so far and press for ac­tion on the le­gis­la­tion next year.

What We're Following See More »
REGULAR ORDER
Ryan Pitching the Importance of Passing a Budget Today
1 minutes ago
THE LATEST

House Speaker Paul Ryan today is trying to convince his large but divided conference that they need to pass a budget under regular order. “Conservatives are revolting against higher top-line spending levels negotiated last fall by President Obama and Ryan’s predecessor, then-Speaker John Boehner (R-OH). GOP centrists are digging in on the other side, pledging to kill any budget that deviates from the two-year, bipartisan budget deal.” Ryan’s three options are to lower the budget numbers to appease the Freedom Caucus, “deem” a budget and move on to the appropriations process, or “preserve Obama-Boehner levels, but seek savings elsewhere.”

Source:
HEADED TO PRESIDENT’S DESK
Trade Bill Would Ban Imports Made with Slave Labor
33 minutes ago
THE DETAILS

“A bill headed for President Barack Obama this week includes a provision that would ban U.S. imports of fish caught by slaves in Southeast Asia, gold mined by children in Africa and garments sewn by abused women in Bangladesh, closing a loophole in an 85-year-old tariff law.” The Senate approved the bill, which would also ban Internet taxes and overhaul trade laws, by a vote of 75-20. It now goes to President Obama.

Source:
TRUMP UP TO 44%
Sanders Closes to Within Seven Nationally in New Poll
46 minutes ago
THE LATEST

Bernie Sanders has closed to within seven points of Hillary Clinton in a new Morning Consult survey. Clinton leads 46%-39%. Consistent with the New Hampshire voting results, Clinton does best with retirees, while Sanders leads by 20 percentage points among those under 30. On the Republican side, Donald Trump is far ahead with 44% support. Trailing by a huge margin are Ted Cruz (17%), Ben Carson (10%) and Marco Rubio (10%).

Source:
LEGACY PLAY
Sanders and Clinton Spar Over … President Obama
12 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

President Obama became a surprise topic of contention toward the end of the Democratic debate, as Hillary Clinton reminded viewers that Sanders had challenged the progressive bona fides of President Obama in 2011 and suggested that someone might challenge him from the left. “The kind of criticism that we’ve heard from Senator Sanders about our president I expect from Republicans, I do not expect from someone running for the Democratic nomination to succeed President Obama,” she said. “Madame Secretary, that is a low blow,” replied Sanders, before getting in another dig during his closing statement: “One of us ran against Barack Obama. I was not that candidate.”

THE 1%
Sanders’s Appeals to Minorities Still Filtered Through Wall Street Talk
13 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

It’s all about the 1% and Wall Street versus everyone else for Bernie Sanders—even when he’s talking about race relations. Like Hillary Clinton, he needs to appeal to African-American and Hispanic voters in coming states, but he insists on doing so through his lens of class warfare. When he got a question from the moderators about the plight of black America, he noted that during the great recession, African Americans “lost half their wealth,” and “instead of tax breaks for billionaires,” a Sanders presidency would deliver jobs for kids. On the very next question, he downplayed the role of race in inequality, saying, “It’s a racial issue, but it’s also a general economic issue.”

×