Hillary Clinton’s Rules for Women

The former of secretary of State laid out a few best practices for women in a new interview with <em>Glamour</em>.

National Journal
Lucia Graves
Add to Briefcase
Lucia Graves
Aug. 7, 2014, 9:16 a.m.

A sad real­ity of Hil­lary Clin­ton’s ca­reer ad­vice for wo­men is that it’s all about men. How to nav­ig­ate the sex­ist taunts that arise in the work­place, how to be less of a per­fec­tion­ist (be­cause men don’t both­er), and how to handle double stand­ards sur­round­ing ap­pear­ance and dress.

The former sec­ret­ary of State presen­ted this guid­ance in an in­ter­view with Glam­our Ed­it­or-in-Chief Cindi Leive, which will ap­pear in full in the magazine’s Septem­ber is­sue. In it, Leive tells Clin­ton many young wo­men don’t want to run for of­fice, that they think it’s a blood sport, to which Clin­ton eas­ily replies: It is. Be­low is her best ad­vice on how to do it any­way.

1. Play the long game.

“It doesn’t have to all hap­pen when you’re young — I mean, one of the most power­ful wo­men in Amer­ic­an polit­ics is Nancy Pelosi. She had five chil­dren. She didn’t go in­to polit­ics un­til her young­est child was in high school…. That’s one of the great things about be­ing a wo­man in today’s world: You have a much longer po­ten­tial work life than our moth­ers or our grand­moth­ers did.”

2. Prac­tice pub­lic speak­ing.

“If you’re not com­fort­able with pub­lic speak­ing — and nobody starts out com­fort­able, you have to learn how to be com­fort­able — prac­tice. I can­not over­state the im­port­ance of prac­ti­cing.”

3. Ask for help.

“Too many people … have this deep-seated fear that if they ask for help, they will be thought less of. In my [view], they’ll be thought more of.”

4. Don’t be per­fect, be will­ing to learn.

“You don’t have to be per­fect. Most men nev­er think like that. They’re just try­ing to fig­ure out what’s the open­ing and how they can seize it.”

5. Don’t be rattled by sex­ism, but do stand up for oth­er wo­men.

“I have gen­er­ally not re­spon­ded [to sex­ist com­ments] if it’s about me. And I have re­spon­ded if it’s about some­body else, be­cause if wo­men in gen­er­al are be­ing de­graded, are be­ing dis­missed, then I can re­spond in a way that demon­strates I’m not tak­ing it per­son­ally but I’m really ser­i­ous about re­ject­ing that kind of be­ha­vi­or.”

6. Your ap­pear­ance shouldn’t mat­ter, but it does.

“I mean, clearly people should meet an ac­cept­able threshold of ap­pro­pri­ate­ness!… But I think that for many wo­men in the pub­lic eye, it just seems that the bur­den is so heavy … it takes a lot of time.”

7. Listen to oth­ers in the work­place.

“Keep­ing your head down and do­ing the best job you can in the be­gin­ning gives you the op­por­tun­ity to be eval­u­ated on the basis of the con­tri­bu­tions you are mak­ing. I of­ten would listen more than talk in my early meet­ings with people.”

8. But not too much.

“At the same time, you can­not be afraid to present your­self.”

9. For­get in­sults.

” … You just have to de­cide you’re go­ing to fol­low Elean­or Roosevelt’s max­im about grow­ing skin as thick as the hide of a rhino­cer­os, and you have to be in­cred­ibly well pre­pared — bet­ter pre­pared [than a man], ac­tu­ally … and you have to have a sup­port group around you, be­cause it can be really a bru­tal ex­per­i­ence.”

10. If you think you don’t want to run, think again.

” … There are many ways to be in­flu­en­tial. I mean, you can work for politi­cians … or in gov­ern­ment and make a dif­fer­ence.”

Marina Koren contributed to this article.
What We're Following See More »
SAYS TRUMP JUST ATTACKING REPUBLICANS
Former Top Aide to McConnell Says GOPers Should Abandon Trump
2 days ago
THE LATEST
“YOU CAN’T CHANGE HISTORY, BUT YOU CAN LEARN FROM IT”
Trump Defends Confederate Statues in Tweetstorm
2 days ago
WHY WE CARE
CEOS HAVE BEEN FLEEING FOR THE EXITS
Trump to End Business Councils
3 days ago
THE LATEST
FROM STATEMENT
McConnell: “No Good Neo-Nazis”
3 days ago
THE LATEST
NO FORMAL LEGISLATIVE EFFORT
CBC Members Call for Removal of Confederate Statues from Capitol
3 days ago
THE LATEST

"Members of the Congressional Black Caucus are reviving calls to remove Confederate statues from the Capitol following the violence at a white nationalist rally in Virginia." Rep. Cedric Richmond, the group's chair, told ABC News that "we will never solve America's race problem if we continue to honor traitors who fought against the United States." And Mississippi Rep. Bennie Thompson said, “Confederate memorabilia have no place in this country and especially not in the United States Capitol." But a CBC spokesperson said no formal legislative effort is afoot.

Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login