Virginia Wants to Bring Back the Electric Chair

With lethal injection drugs in short supply, the Virginia’s House of Delegates is joining the list of states pushing for archaic methods of killing prisoners.

'Old Sparky', the decommissioned electric chair in which 361 prisoners were executed between 1924 and 1964, at the Texas Prison Museum in Huntsville, Texas. 
National Journal
Dustin Volz
See more stories about...
Dustin Volz
Jan. 22, 2014, 10:22 a.m.

As leth­al-in­jec­tion drugs be­come harder to come by, states are turn­ing to elec­tro­cu­tion to carry out ex­e­cu­tions.

The Vir­gin­ia House of Del­eg­ates passed a bill Wed­nes­day that would man­date elec­tro­cu­tion be used to carry out a death sen­tence if a leth­al in­jec­tion can­not be per­formed. The vote is the latest and bold­est man­euver in a steady stream of state moves aimed at ad­dress­ing the grow­ing short­age of death-pen­alty drugs.

States across the coun­try are run­ning out of the drugs they have re­lied on for dec­ades to carry out death sen­tences, as European man­u­fac­tur­ers are mak­ing it in­creas­ingly dif­fi­cult to pro­cure such chem­ic­als if their use is to be a leth­al in­jec­tion. The European Uni­on strongly op­poses cap­it­al pun­ish­ment and has pres­sured com­pan­ies that know­ingly ex­port drugs to the U.S. for ex­e­cu­tions.

Vir­gin­ia’s move would make it the first state in the coun­try to man­date death by elec­tro­cu­tion. The meas­ure, House Bill 1052, passed by a vote of 64-32. To be­come law, it would need to clear the state’s Sen­ate and get a sig­na­ture from new Demo­crat­ic Gov. Terry McAul­iffe, a pro­spect that cur­rently seems un­likely.

Oth­er states, also fa­cing drug short­ages, are turn­ing to ex­e­cu­tion meth­ods that un­til re­cently have been de­clared all but ob­sol­ete.

Last week a law­maker in Wyom­ing pro­posed a re­turn to the fir­ing squad be­cause it is “the cheapest [op­tion] for the state.” Mis­souri’s State­house is also flirt­ing with re­in­tro­duct­ing fir­ing squads, which a bill spon­sor said was “no less hu­mane than leth­al in­jec­tion.” Demo­crat­ic U.S. Sen. Claire Mc­Caskill tweeted in re­sponse, “Not my state’s finest mo­ment.”

Most states, in­clud­ing Flor­ida and Texas, are either turn­ing to secret com­pound­ing phar­ma­cies to pro­cure their drugs or car­ry­ing out ex­e­cu­tions with new, un­tested leth­al-in­jec­tion cock­tails. Ohio ex­ecuted Den­nis McGuire last week with a two-drug pro­tocol that re­portedly left the con­victed mur­der­er and rap­ist writh­ing in pain for 10 minutes.

Richard Di­eter, ex­ec­ut­ive dir­ect­or of the Death Pen­alty In­form­a­tion Cen­ter, which of­fi­cially takes no stance but is usu­ally re­garded as op­posed to cap­it­al pun­ish­ment, called the pro­pos­als in Vir­gin­ia and else­where “mostly sym­bol­ic” at­tempts to make ac­cess to ne­ces­sary leth­al drugs easi­er for states.

“There are plenty of drugs to kill people with,” Di­eter said. “What states don’t want is a lot of in­ter­fer­ence. These are state­ments aimed at courts or reg­u­lat­ors to al­low leth­al in­jec­tions.”

Di­eter ad­ded that the “de­mise of the death pen­alty would be hastened” if fir­ing squads or elec­tric chairs be­came nor­mal again be­cause of the in­ev­it­able cruel-and-un­usu­al-pun­ish­ment chal­lenges that would await.

Vir­gin­ia cur­rently al­lows death-row in­mates to choose between death by leth­al in­jec­tion or elec­tro­cu­tion. The lat­ter op­tion has only been used in sev­en of the 86 ex­e­cu­tions Vir­gin­ia per­formed since 1995, ac­cord­ing to DPIC. Vir­gin­ia’s last ex­e­cu­tion, on Jan. 16, 2013, was car­ried out in an elec­tric chair.

“The ‘cruel and un­usu­al’ clause is not con­cerned if the in­mate chooses a pun­ish­ment,” Di­eter said. “If the warden chooses it, that’s a dif­fer­ent thing.”

The state’s De­part­ment of Cor­rec­tions has said its leth­al-in­jec­tion drug sup­ply will ex­pire in Novem­ber.

Re­pub­lic­an Del. Jack­son Miller, the bill’s spon­sor, did not im­me­di­ately re­spond to a re­quest for com­ment.

To learn more about the wide-reach­ing im­plic­a­tions of states con­front­ing leth­al-in­jec­tion drug short­ages, read Na­tion­al Journ­al‘s earli­er cov­er­age here.

What We're Following See More »
STAFF PICKS
History Already Being Less Kind to Hastert’s Leadership
1 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

In light of his recent confessions, the speakership of Dennis Hastert is being judged far more harshly. The New York Times' Carl Hulse notes that in hindsight, Hastert now "fares poorly" on a number of fronts, from his handling of the Mark Foley page scandal to "an explosion" of earmarks to the weakening of committee chairmen. "Even his namesake Hastert rule—the informal standard that no legislation should be brought to a vote without the support of a majority of the majority — has come to be seen as a structural barrier to compromise."

Source:
‘STARTING FROM ZERO’
Trump Ill Prepared for General Election
1 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Even if "[t]he Republican presidential nomination may be in his sights ... Trump has so far ignored vital preparations needed for a quick and effective transition to the general election. The New York businessman has collected little information about tens of millions of voters he needs to turn out in the fall. He's sent few people to battleground states compared with likely Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, accumulated little if any research on her, and taken no steps to build a network capable of raising the roughly $1 billion needed to run a modern-day general election campaign."

Source:
27TH AMENDMENT
Congress Can’t Seem Not to Pay Itself
4 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

Rep. Dave Young can't even refuse his own paycheck. The Iowa Republican is trying to make a point that if Congress can't pass a budget (it's already missed the April 15 deadline) then it shouldn't be paid. But, he's been informed, the 27th Amendment prohibits him from refusing his own pay. "Young’s efforts to dock his own pay, however, are duck soup compared to his larger goal: docking the pay of every lawmaker when Congress drops the budget ball." His bill to stiff his colleagues has only mustered the support of three of them. Another bill, sponsored by Rep. Jim Cooper (D-TN), has about three dozen co-sponsors.

Source:
THE QUESTION
How Far Away from Cleveland is the California GOP Staying?
5 hours ago
THE ANSWER

Sixty miles away, in Sandusky, Ohio. "We're pretty bitter about that," said Harmeet Dhillon, vice chairwoman of the California Republican Party. "It sucks to be California, we're like the ugly stepchild. They need us for our cash and our donors, they don't need us for anything else."

ATTORNEY MAY RELEASE THEM ANYWAY
SCOTUS Will Not Allow ‘DC Madam’ Phone Records to Be Released
5 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

Anyone looking forward to seeing some boldfaced names on the client list of the late Deborah Jeane Palfrey, the "DC Madam," will have to wait a little longer. "The Supreme Court announced Monday it would not intervene to allow" the release of her phone records, "despite one of her former attorneys claiming the records are “very relevant” to the presidential election. Though he has repeatedly threatened to release the records if courts do not modify a 2007 restraining order, Montgomery Blair Sibley tells U.S. News he’s not quite sure what he now will do."

Source:
×