With Hastings Retirement, Republican Revolutionaries Mostly Gone

Only five of 73 House Republicans elected in the class of 1994 will be in Congress after this year.

WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 05: U.S. House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct Chairman Doc Hastings (R-WA) holds a news conference after conducting a closed meeting of the committee at the Capitol October 5, 2006 in Washington, DC. Hastings announced that the committee will open an investigation into whether or not former U.S. Representative Mark Foley (R-FL) engaged in any inappropriate behavior while serving in the House. 
National Journal
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Alex Roarty
Feb. 13, 2014, 8:29 a.m.

Tea-party fer­vor is alive and well in today’s House Re­pub­lic­an caucus. But the ori­gin­al con­ser­vat­ive Re­pub­lic­an re­volu­tion­ar­ies are nearly all gone.

Rep. Doc Hast­ings, who was one of 73 fresh­man House Re­pub­lic­ans when the GOP gained con­trol of the House in 1994, an­nounced his re­tire­ment Thursday. In a state­ment, he said it was time to let his cent­ral Wash­ing­ton dis­trict pick a new lead­er.

“Last Fri­day, I cel­eb­rated my 73rd birth­day and while I have the abil­ity and seni­or­ity to con­tin­ue serving Cent­ral Wash­ing­ton, it is time for the voters to choose a new per­son with new en­ergy to rep­res­ent them in the people’s House,” Hast­ings said.

The House GOP won 54 seats in 1994, part of a Re­pub­lic­an wave that year led by fu­ture House Speak­er Newt Gin­grich. But only five of them are try­ing to re­turn to Con­gress in 2014: Reps. Rod­ney Frel­inghuysen, R-N.J., Wal­ter Jones, R-N.C., Frank Lo­Bi­ondo, R-N.J., Mac Thorn­berry, R-Texas, and Ed Whit­field, R-Ky.

An­oth­er mem­ber of the class of 1994, Rep. Tom Lath­am, an­nounced his own re­tire­ment earli­er this cycle.

Hast­ings’s seat, which is heav­ily Re­pub­lic­an, is not ex­pec­ted to be tar­geted by Demo­crats in the fall.

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