Republicans Target Mary Landrieu Over Dems’ Climate Talk-Fest

Senator Mary Landrieu (D-LA) speaks to reporters at a joint session of Congress for President Obama address on February 24, 2009.
National Journal
Ben Geman
Add to Briefcase
Ben Geman
March 11, 2014, 7:46 a.m.

Louisi­ana Demo­crat Mary Landrieu didn’t take part in Sen­ate Demo­crats’ all-night talk­a­thon on glob­al warm­ing, but Re­pub­lic­an polit­ic­al op­er­at­ives are try­ing to teth­er her to the cham­ber’s cli­mate hawks any­way.

A new Na­tion­al Re­pub­lic­an Sen­at­ori­al Com­mit­tee Web ad titled “Wait­ing for Mary Landrieu” ac­cuses the three-term Demo­crat of “wait­ing” while reg­u­la­tions pile up and, in ref­er­ence to the talk­a­thon, “wait­ing while her lead­ers con­demn Amer­ic­an en­ergy on the Sen­ate floor.”

Landrieu is among sev­er­al vul­ner­able Sen­ate Demo­crats fa­cing reelec­tion — in­clud­ing Mark Be­gich of Alaska and Mark Pry­or of Arkan­sas — who didn’t join 31 Demo­crat­ic col­leagues who held the Sen­ate floor all night to call at­ten­tion to cli­mate change.

The NR­SC also sent out press re­leases al­leging sev­er­al Demo­crats fa­cing reelec­tion who didn’t join in (like Pry­or) and some that did (like Col­or­ado’s Mark Ud­all) are part of the “rad­ic­al Obama/Re­id war on Amer­ic­an en­ergy.”

But Sen. Tim Kaine, a Vir­gin­ia Demo­crat who did speak on the floor, said talk­ing about cli­mate change is a polit­ic­al win­ner over­all.

“Vir­gin­ia might be the best bell­weth­er state in Amer­ica now in terms of the match between the elect­or­ate and the na­tion­al elect­or­ate. I know what Vir­gini­ans think about cli­mate change be­cause I ran for the Sen­ate in 2012 and we asked them,” he said on MS­N­BC this morn­ing.

“And over­whelm­ingly what Vir­gini­ans think is this: The sci­ence that demon­strates the con­nec­tion between hu­man activ­ity and cli­mate change is real, we be­lieve it, and we need to do something about it,” Kaine ad­ded.

Landrieu, however, sits to the right of her caucus on en­ergy and cli­mate and is run­ning for reelec­tion in a state where Mitt Rom­ney solidly beat Pres­id­ent Obama in 2012. She has cri­ti­cized EPA cli­mate-change reg­u­la­tions.

Landrieu is chair­wo­man of the Sen­ate En­ergy and Nat­ur­al Re­sources Com­mit­tee. Ac­cord­ing to Roll Call, Landrieu said that while she wasn’t tak­ing part in the cli­mate talk-fest, “I think what they’re do­ing is help­ful.”

What We're Following See More »
TO VISIT US TROOPS
John McCain Paid Secret Visit To Syria
7 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Senator John McCain paid a secret visit to Northern Syria over the weekend during his trip abroad. McCain reportedly went "to speak with American officials and Kurdish fighters leading the charge to push ISIS militants out of Raqqa, the jihadist group’s stronghold." The trip was organized with the help of U.S. military.

Source:
‘MORE WITH LESS’
Trump Budget to Call for Major Cuts
8 hours ago
THE DETAILS

"The Trump administration will deliver its first budget to Congress in mid-March, and the president confirmed Wednesday it will contain major cuts for federal agencies." The blueprint, expected to be released in mid-March, will not include the kinds of specifics usually seen in White House budgets, but rather will instruct the heads of agencies to "do more with less."

Source:
DEFERENCE TO PRESIDENT
More Republicans Trust Trump than GOP Members
9 hours ago
WHY WE CARE
PAC WILL TARGET INCUMBENTS
Sanders Acolytes Taking the Movement Local
11 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

"While Democrats nationwide have put the focus on President Trump, the Sanders wing of the party has engaged in an intramural fight to remake the party in a more populist, liberal mold." From Washington state to California to Florida, Sanders loyalists are making good on their promise to remake the party from the ground up. And just last week, a "group of former Sanders campaign aides launched a super PAC with the explicit goal of mounting primary challenges to Democratic incumbents."

Source:
THANKS TO MILITARY ROLE
McMaster Requires Congressional Approval
12 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Congress will need to vote on Donald Trump's pick of Lt. General H.R. McMaster to be his next national security adviser, but not for the reason you think. The position of NSA doesn't require Senate approval, but since McMaster currently holds a three-star military position, Congress will need to vote to allow him to keep his position instead of forcing him to drop one star and become a Major General, which could potentially affect his pension.

Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login