All Politics Is Local for Hillary Clinton Super PAC

Ready for Hillary dispatched 20 volunteers to get out the vote in local New Hampshire election Tuesday.

Intern Avery Jaffe is seen working at the 'Ready For Hillary' Super PAC offices on behalf of undeclared US Presidential candidate and former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton July 11, 2013 in a shopping center office in Alexandria, Virginia. The 'Ready For Hillary' Super PAC has already mailed out 50,000 'Ready For Hillary' bumber stickers to potential financial doners. The Super PAC is sending out I-Phone buttons, lapel buttons, bumper stickers, t-shirts, hats, and other promotional items. 
National Journal
Adam Wollner
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Adam Wollner
March 12, 2014, 1:27 p.m.

Ready for Hil­lary is seek­ing to make in­roads with voters any­way it can — even by in­ter­ven­ing in a loc­al elec­tion. Es­pe­cially if it’s in New Hamp­shire.

The su­per PAC lay­ing ground­work for a pos­sible Hil­lary Clin­ton pres­id­en­tial cam­paign dis­patched 20 vo­lun­teers to west­ern New Hamp­shire on Tues­day to help get out the vote in a com­pet­it­ive race for a spot on the state’s Ex­ec­ut­ive Coun­cil, a five-mem­ber state gov­ern­ment over­sight board. And while Demo­crats ul­ti­mately came up short in the spe­cial elec­tion, the trip was far from a loss for Ready for Hil­lary, which con­tin­ues to grow its list of po­ten­tial Clin­ton sup­port­ers.

Demo­crat Mi­chael Cryans was locked in a tight battle with Re­pub­lic­an Joe Ken­ney to rep­res­ent a 264,000-pop­u­la­tion dis­trict on the coun­cil, which ad­vises and serves as a watch­dog over the gov­ernor.

Re­pub­lic­ans have held the seat for dec­ades, and Demo­crats ac­tu­ally came close to pick­ing it off. The race was too close to call on Tues­day night, but Cryans con­ceded on Wed­nes­day morn­ing. He lost by about 1,300 votes.

Ready for Hil­lary spokes­man Seth Bring­man said the bulk of the group’s ef­fort was dir­ec­ted to­ward en­cour­aging col­lege stu­dents, a key but some­times un­re­li­able Demo­crat­ic con­stitu­ency, from Dart­mouth Uni­versity and Ply­mouth State Uni­versity to cast bal­lots, as WMUR-TV first re­por­ted Tues­day. The su­per PAC or­gan­ized rides to the polls — col­lect­ing valu­able email ad­dresses for its list all the while.

The loc­al race gave the group an op­por­tun­ity to sign up new sup­port­ers and gain voter in­form­a­tion in the first-in-the-na­tion primary state, and it show­cased its will­ing­ness to lend a hand to can­did­ates not named Clin­ton. Some Demo­crats have re­cently ex­pressed con­cern that the su­per PACs fo­cused on put­ting Clin­ton in the White House are di­vert­ing re­sources away from the party’s press­ing needs in 2014.

Bring­man did not name any spe­cif­ic 2014 races on the group’s radar at this point, but he said Ready for Hil­lary will mo­bil­ize sup­port for can­did­ates Clin­ton en­dorses, as it did in the 2013 Vir­gin­ia gubernat­ori­al and New York City may­or­al races. Dur­ing the fi­nal stretches of those cam­paigns, the group sent out fun­drais­ing emails and dir­ec­ted vo­lun­teers to help get voters to the polls.

What We're Following See More »
16 YEARS, $70 BILLION DOWN THE DRAIN
Report: U.S. Failed in Training Afghan Forces
10 minutes ago
THE DETAILS

"The U.S. has invested 16 years and more than $70 billion to train Afghan security forces, but the effort has been undermined by poor planning, training and oversight, a government watchdog said in a report Thursday. The 259-page report by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, or Sigar, offered a critical assessment of one of the top goals of the U.S. effort in Afghanistan—to train local forces so they can secure Afghanistan on their own. The report details how unprepared the U.S. was to train local forces when the war began in 2001 and concludes many of the problems that hampered the early days of the war still exist."

Source:
WARNING ISSUED 2009, STILL PROBLEM
People Terrorist Ties Licensed to Fly, Repair Aircraft
13 minutes ago
THE DETAILS

In 2009, the Federal Aviation Administration warned that individuals with terrorist ties were licensed to fly or repair planes. Years later, it is still a problem. Researcher Mark Schiffer found several known terrorists have FAA licenses when testing an algorithm on public records. Part of the problem is the FAA does not use photos on licenses and does not completely vet information. But they claim pilot certificates are to show the pilot's training level—not security—and pilots have to have government-issued IDs.

Source:
OTHER OFFICIALS ALSO USED PRIVATE ACCOUNTS
Kushner Private Email for WH Business
1 hours ago
THE DETAILS

"Presidential son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner has corresponded with other administration officials about White House matters through a private email account set up during the transition last December, part of a larger pattern of Trump administration aides using personal email accounts for government business." His lawyer said Kushner and his colleagues usually forwarded news articles or political commentaries.

Source:
TO TALK ABOUT AGENDAS AND ELECTIONS
Trump to Dine with GOP Donors Tuesday
1 hours ago
THE DETAILS

"President Trump will meet with major GOP donors for a private dinner on Tuesday in New York as part of a fundraising effort for the Republican National Committee, according to three people briefed on his plans." Trump is expected to talk about the party's agenda on the Hill and the midterm elections.

Source:
VENEZUELA, NORTH KOREA ADDED
White House Announces Enhanced Vetting for Eight Countries
1 hours ago
WHY WE CARE
"President Trump is replacing his controversial travel ban with a targeted list of restrictions that will enhance vetting for nationals from eight countries, senior administration officials announced Sunday. The eight countries on the modified list of countries are Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela and Yemen." The officials say these states failed to comply with the U.S. information-sharing requirements that aim to make vetting processes stronger.
Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login