Here Are the 17 Ways You Can Get an Obamacare Extension

The administration Wednesday released a long list of loopholes to the enrollment deadline.

Rocky rollout:
Sam Baker and Clara Ritger
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Sam Baker Clara Ritger
March 26, 2014, 10:11 a.m.

The dead­line to en­roll in Obama­care is March 31—un­less you’re in the hos­pit­al. Or there’s a nat­ur­al dis­aster near you. Or you ex­per­i­enced ba­sic­ally any prob­lem with Health­

Late Tues­day night, the Obama ad­min­is­tra­tion an­nounced that it was giv­ing some con­sumers more time to sign up for health in­sur­ance. While it’s not tech­nic­ally mov­ing the March 31 dead­line, the ad­min­is­tra­tion is of­fer­ing an ex­ten­sion—of un­known length—for people who had prob­lems try­ing to meet the dead­line.

Ac­cord­ing to a guid­ance doc­u­ment that the Health and Hu­man Ser­vices De­part­ment re­leased Wed­nes­day, you can ap­ply for an ex­ten­sion for the fol­low­ing reas­ons:

1) You ex­per­i­enced a nat­ur­al dis­aster.

2) You have a med­ic­al emer­gency, such as an un­ex­pec­ted hos­pit­al­iz­a­tion.

3) Health­ or its sup­port­ing sys­tems had a planned out­age when you tried to en­roll.

4) Someone who helped you sign up for cov­er­age put you in the wrong plan.

5) Someone who helped you sign up for cov­er­age didn’t ac­tu­ally en­roll you.

6) You didn’t get the tax cred­its or cost-shar­ing re­duc­tions you’re eli­gible for.

7) The in­sur­ance com­pany didn’t get your in­form­a­tion from Health­

8) The in­sur­ance com­pany got your in­form­a­tion from Health­, but it con­tained er­rors.

9) You’re an im­mig­rant, and Health­ told you that you wer­en’t eli­gible for cov­er­age or tax cred­its but you are.

10) In­cor­rect plan data were dis­played when you se­lec­ted a plan, and it might not be the plan you want.

11) Your fam­ily couldn’t en­roll to­geth­er due to sys­tem er­rors.

12) Health­ said you were in­eligible for Medi­caid or CHIP, but you are and need to get in­to the pro­gram.

13) Health­ said you were eli­gible for Medi­caid or CHIP, but you aren’t and need to get private cov­er­age.

14) You’re still get­ting er­ror mes­sages on Health­

15) A case­work­er doesn’t re­solve er­rors with your ap­plic­a­tion for cov­er­age by March 31.

16) You are a vic­tim of do­mest­ic ab­use (you get un­til May 31 to sign up).

17) Oth­er sys­tem er­rors stopped you from sign­ing up.

Ad­min­is­tra­tion of­fi­cials are ex­pec­ted to cla­ri­fy how much ex­tra time those in­di­vidu­als get to en­roll in a press call later Wed­nes­day af­ter­noon.

A com­plete chart is avail­able from the ad­min­is­tra­tion.

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