Here Comes the Army Investigation Into Bowe Bergdahl’s Capture

Don’t expect any fast answers.

National Journal
Billy House
Add to Briefcase
Billy House
June 16, 2014, 10:05 a.m.

The Army says it has launched an in­vest­ig­a­tion in­to the cir­cum­stances sur­round­ing how and why Army Sgt. Bowe Ber­g­dahl dis­ap­peared from his base in Afgh­anistan in 2009.

Maj. Gen. Ken­neth Dahl, an Army of­ficer with Afgh­anistan com­bat ex­per­i­ence, will lead the ef­fort — but the Army says that will not in­clude form­al ques­tion­ing of Ber­g­dahl him­self, at least not right away.

“The in­vest­ig­at­ing of­ficer will not in­ter­view Sgt. Ber­g­dahl un­til the re­in­teg­ra­tion team clears such in­ter­ac­tion, so no timeline for com­ple­tion of the in­vest­ig­a­tion has been set,” the Army state­ment of­fers.

Ber­g­dahl, 28, went miss­ing on June 30, 2009, in Afgh­anistan’s Pak­tika province, where his bat­talion was de­ployed. He spent five years in cap­tiv­ity un­til his re­lease on May 31, in a con­tro­ver­sial ex­change by the Obama ad­min­is­tra­tion for five Taliban pris­on­ers trans­ferred from the U.S. pris­on at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. The ad­min­is­tra­tion says that con­cerns about Ber­g­dahl’s de­teri­or­at­ing health played a role in its think­ing.

Ber­g­dahl was trans­por­ted from a mil­it­ary hos­pit­al last Fri­day and taken to an Army med­ic­al fa­cil­ity in San Ant­o­nio, Texas. In a state­ment re­leased Monday an­noun­cing the in­vest­ig­a­tion, the Army did not make any men­tion of earli­er pre­lim­in­ary fact-find­ing ef­forts that in­dic­ated Ber­dahl had left his post de­lib­er­ately.

But the state­ment does say that Dahl and his in­vest­ig­at­ive team “will have ac­cess to pre­vi­ously gathered doc­u­ment­ary evid­ence, in­clud­ing the 2009 in­vest­ig­a­tion.”

“The primary func­tion of this in­vest­ig­a­tion, as in any oth­er in­vest­ig­a­tion, is to as­cer­tain facts and re­port them to the ap­point­ing au­thor­ity,” the state­ment adds. But it says, “The Army’s top pri­or­ity re­mains Sgt. Ber­g­dahl’s health and re­in­teg­ra­tion. We ask that every­one re­spect the time and pri­vacy ne­ces­sary to ac­com­plish the ob­ject­ives of the last phase of re­in­teg­ra­tion.”

What We're Following See More »
DEFERENCE TO PRESIDENT
More Republicans Trust Trump than GOP Members
32 minutes ago
WHY WE CARE
PAC WILL TARGET INCUMBENTS
Sanders Acolytes Taking the Movement Local
2 hours ago
WHY WE CARE

"While Democrats nationwide have put the focus on President Trump, the Sanders wing of the party has engaged in an intramural fight to remake the party in a more populist, liberal mold." From Washington state to California to Florida, Sanders loyalists are making good on their promise to remake the party from the ground up. And just last week, a "group of former Sanders campaign aides launched a super PAC with the explicit goal of mounting primary challenges to Democratic incumbents."

Source:
THANKS TO MILITARY ROLE
McMaster Requires Congressional Approval
3 hours ago
THE DETAILS

Congress will need to vote on Donald Trump's pick of Lt. General H.R. McMaster to be his next national security adviser, but not for the reason you think. The position of NSA doesn't require Senate approval, but since McMaster currently holds a three-star military position, Congress will need to vote to allow him to keep his position instead of forcing him to drop one star and become a Major General, which could potentially affect his pension.

Source:
THE QUESTION
How Many Signatures Has the Petition for Trump’s Tax Returns Received?
7 hours ago
THE ANSWER

More than 1 million, setting a record. More than 100,000 signatures triggers an official White House response.

Source:
SENT LETTERS TO A DOZEN ORGANIZATIONS
Senate Intel Looks to Preserve Records of Russian Interference
7 hours ago
THE LATEST

"The Senate Intelligence Committee is seeking to ensure that records related to Russia’s alleged intervention in the 2016 U.S. elections are preserved as it begins investigating that country’s ties to the Trump team. The panel sent more than a dozen letters to 'organizations, agencies and officials' on Friday, asking them to preserve materials related to the congressional investigation, according to a Senate aide, who was not authorized to comment publicly. The Senate Intelligence Committee is spearheading the most comprehensive probe on Capitol Hill of Russia’s alleged activities in the elections."

Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login