Jay Carney’s Farewell Love Letter

“It’s always a pleasure no matter how hard it gets here, how hot it can be, and contentious as it sometimes is.”

National Journal
Brian Resnick
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Brian Resnick
June 18, 2014, 10:02 a.m.

Even on his last day — work­ing in a po­s­i­tion that is re­garded as one of the most gruel­ing jobs in the White House — Jay Car­ney didn’t get a pass from the press corps.

The first ques­tion he fielded after giv­ing his thanks moved quickly away from his de­par­ture:

“On be­half of my col­leagues, con­grat­u­la­tions on mak­ing it to your last brief­ing,” a White House cor­res­pond­ent said. “If we can get to Ir­aq, the pres­id­ent is meet­ing with law­makers this af­ter­noon. Is he go­ing to be in a po­s­i­tion to tell the law­makers his de­cisions … “

Which un­der­scores an ob­vi­ous point: Jay Car­ney’s job is big­ger than Jay Car­ney. He might leave, but the is­sues will re­main, the press corp will re­main. He’s just one re­place­able cog in a fun­da­ment­al Amer­ic­an in­sti­tu­tion. But serving in the job for three years — which is longer than any of his pre­de­cessors in the past 20 years — has per­haps lent him as good a per­spect­ive on the re­la­tion­ship between the press and White House as any­body.

His farewell:

As I think most of you now un­der­stand and be­lieve, it’s al­ways a pleas­ure no mat­ter how hard it gets here, how hot it can be, and con­ten­tious as it some­times is. You know the pres­id­ent — to many of us — said of the jobs we have here in the White House, most of us will nev­er be in a po­s­i­tion to do more good for more people as we are in now. We should take ad­vant­age of it. And that is something that we all take to heart. I don’t ever ex­pect to be in a po­s­i­tion again to be a part of something that has at least the po­ten­tial to do more good for more people. That’s been a spe­cial thing, in­deed. I loved my years as a re­port­er…. Re­port­ing some­times can be an autonom­ous ex­er­cise. It’s your story, your byline. What was so dif­fer­ent about the [White House] ex­per­i­ence for me is it was all about a team ef­fort and all about a goal that had noth­ing to do with any in­di­vidu­al, not even the pres­id­ent. That’s been ex­traordin­ar­ily grat­i­fy­ing to be a part of.

What We're Following See More »
THE PRESIDENT’S POCKET
16th Charity Cancels Function at Mar-a-Lago
1 hours ago
THE LATEST
EARLY SEPTEMBER
Senate Plans Two Hearings on Health Insurance
2 hours ago
THE LATEST

"The Senate health committee will hold two hearings early next month on how the nation’s individual health insurance marketplaces can be stabilized, as party leaders grasp for a fresh path following the collapse of the Republican effort to repeal and replace much of former President Barack Obama’s health care law. GOP and Democratic leaders are exploring whether they can craft a bipartisan but limited bill aimed at curbing rising premiums for people who buy their own insurance. In many markets, consumers are seeing steeply rising premiums and fewer insurers willing to sell policies."

Source:
OVER N. KOREA NUCLEAR PROGRAMS
U.S. Imposes Sanctions on 16 Companies
2 hours ago
THE LATEST
After Collisions, Navy to Suspend Some Operations
6 hours ago
THE LATEST

"The U.S. Navy announced a pause in its global operations and patrols and has begun a broad investigation after the destroyer USS John S. McCain collided with a merchant vessel, leaving 10 sailors missing, the second such incident in as many months."

Source:
“ZERO CHANCE” OF DEFAULT
Mnuchin, McConnell: We’ll Raise Debt Limit
6 hours ago
THE DETAILS

"U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell predicted Congress will raise the country’s debt limit in time to prevent an unprecedented default." Speaking at a Kentucky event, Mnuchin said, “Everybody understands, this is not a Republican issue, this is not a Democrat issue. We need to be able to pay our debts.” McConnell echoed him, saying there's "zero chance" the ceiling doesn't get raised.

Source:
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login