National Journal Sets 2014 Traffic High on Heels of Magazine Redesign

Traffic Record Continues Trend of Growing Digital Audience for the Brand

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July 2, 2014, 7:40 a.m.

Wash­ing­ton, D.C. (Ju­ly 2, 2014) — Na­tion­al Journ­al de­livered its highest monthly traffic of the year in June, with more than 3.3 mil­lion monthly uniques vis­it­ing the site. The in­creased read­er­ship comes on the heels of the brand’s magazine re­design, the latest phase in a lar­ger re­ima­gin­ing of the Na­tion­al Journ­al brand, which began last fall with the suc­cess­ful re­launch of the Na­tion­al Journ­al web­site, led by Ed­it­or-in-Chief and Pres­id­ent Tim Grieve.

Na­tion­al Journ­al‘s sus­tained growth is proof that great journ­al­ism and great traffic go hand-in-hand,” said Grieve. “The new magazine adds an­oth­er di­men­sion for us: We have great in-the-mo­ment journ­al­ism and ex­traordin­ary long-form journ­al­ism too, a mix that is driv­ing in­flu­en­tial read­ers — and top-flight journ­al­ists — to Na­tion­al Journ­al.

June 2014 marked a num­ber of mile­stones for Na­tion­al Journ­al. The re­designed magazine launched June 19th and drew im­me­di­ate no­tice throughout the worlds of journ­al­ism and polit­ics; Mar­in Cogan’s pro­file of former Montana Gov. Bri­an Sch­weitzer made head­lines in nearly every na­tion­al me­dia out­let, and Sch­weitzer him­self was even­tu­ally forced to apo­lo­gize for com­ments he made in Cogan’s story.  Ron Fourni­er’s columns on Obama­care, the Vet­er­ans’ Ad­min­is­tra­tion and Bowe Ber­g­dahl drove con­ver­sa­tion throughout Wash­ing­ton, and his column on Demo­crats’ frus­tra­tion with the pres­id­ent be­came the single-best-read piece on Na­tion­al Journ­al since the death of Osama bin Laden in 2011.  Tim Al­berta and Shane Gold­mach­er broke key stor­ies on Eric Can­tor’s primary loss and the race to suc­ceed him as ma­jor­ity lead­er. And Sam Baker and a big team of Na­tion­al Journ­al re­port­ers drove huge read­er­ship to cov­er­age of the Su­preme Court’s crit­ic­al de­cisions at the end of the month.

Along with the unique vis­it­or growth, the de­liv­ery of in­nov­at­ive di­git­al ad­vert­ising solu­tions has con­trib­uted to 153% di­git­al rev­en­ue growth this year for the brand. Na­tion­al Journ­al con­tin­ues to ag­gress­ively ex­pand its di­git­al busi­ness with Na­tion­al Journ­al‘s product and de­vel­op­ment team fo­cused on build­ing a new di­git­al product pipeline for the second half of the year.

Ad­di­tion­ally, Na­tion­al Journ­al staff con­tin­ues to grow.  In March, Tim Hart­man was named CEO of the lar­ger Na­tion­al Journ­al Group, and Pub­lish­er Poppy Mac­Don­ald and Grieve were named Pres­id­ent. Ad­di­tion­ally, in the past month, Emily Schul­the­is, Alex­ia Camp­bell, Rachel Roubein, Zach Co­hen, and magazine staff writers and con­trib­ut­ors Michelle Cottle, Nora Ca­plan-Brick­er, Si­mon van Zuylen-Wood, Daniel Lib­it, and Eth­an Ep­stein joined the grow­ing Na­tion­al Journ­al ed­it­or­i­al team.

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