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What the Government Wants School Lunches to Look Like What the Government Wants School Lunches to Look Like

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What the Government Wants School Lunches to Look Like

Would you like some politics with your low-fat pudding?

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(Screengrab)

The White House's war on mystery meat has hit a snag.

This week, first lady Michelle Obama shot back at House Republicans for resisting federal nutrition regulations for lunches at 100,000 public schools. "The last thing we can afford to do right now is play politics with our kids' health," she said Wednesday during a meeting with nutrition leaders.

 

House Republicans are trying to roll back changes to school lunches introduced in 2012 through a proposed 2015 Agriculture Department spending bill. They're looking for a one-year delay to the requirements, which push healthy ingredients in and junk food out, to give schools more time to comply. Here's what those regulations look like and how they're different from the old school lunches:

School Lunch
School lunch standards proposed in 2012 involve more of the good stuff, like fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and less of the bad, such as salt-coated fries smothered in melted cheese. (National Journal)

To the disappointment of some young students, the standards involve more of the good stuff, like fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and less of the bad, such as salt-coated fries smothered in melted cheese.

 

"We all share the goal of addressing childhood obesity and serving healthier meals to our students, but the top-down, one-size-fits-all approach by the White House on this issue simply isn't working,' Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill., said in a statement to Politico's Morning Agriculture newsletter on Wednesday.

Indeed, although 90 percent of schools already meet the 2012 nutrition standards, some school officials say the healthy requirements are "just too challenging." To them, the White House says, "Tough." 

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