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Could You Live on $77 a Week?

Minimum-wage advocates begin their 'Live the Wage' challenge

Republicans Announce Plan to Require a Vote on Iran Nuclear Deal

A group of senators said late Wednesday that sanctions would be automatically reimposed if the White House does not consult Congress.

Meriam Ibrahim Is Free From Sudan

She arrived in Rome a day after Congress held a hearing on how to help her. 

'Let Me Google That for You'—Now a Congressional Bill

Some think the government is wasting money on an agency that search engines have made obsolete. One bill would eliminate it altogether.

Why the NSA Keeps Tracking People Even After They're Dead

A newly disclosed government rule book reveals just how easy it is to get placed on a terrorist watch list—and how difficult it can be to get taken off.

The State Department Really Doesn’t Want to Break Up Iraq

A decentralized federal system is best for Iraq and for U.S. interests, a State Department official says.

U.S. Senate Panel Backs Vietnam Nuclear Trade Pact, But Tightens Conditions

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Robert Menendez's measure passed in a bipartisan voice vote and limits the U.S.-Vietnam pact to 30 years.

One State Is Being Sued Over Obamacare Politics

A lawsuit filed Wednesday accuses Tennessee of denying coverage to low-income patients.

The FCC Is Getting Serious About Enforcing Its Last Remaining Net-Neutrality Rule

The agency threatens to crack down on Internet providers that lie about speed.

What Happens When Your Car Gets Hacked?

Connected cars could give cybercriminals a whole new range of targets.

Senate Confirms Creedon for NNSA No. 2 Position

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday confirmed Madelyn Creedon to become the No. 2 official at the National Nuclear Security Administration.

In Iraq, Now What?

Lawmakers question where the U.S. went wrong in military strategy.

9/11 Commission Chair: Congress Is the Biggest Obstacle to Stopping the Next Terrorist Attack

The Department of Homeland Security, the commission, even Congress itself say congressional oversight is out of control.

A One-Step Guide to Infuriating an EPA Official

The agency chief touts her staff's work after a Republican accused her committee of kowtowing to a green group.

Who Voted—and Who Didn't—for U.N. Investigation of Potential War Crimes in Gaza

The U.N. Human Rights Council has announced a probe into military operations in the region, triggering dismay from Israelis and praise from Palestinians.

States Would Sue to Kill City Internet Service

State legislatures threatened to take the FCC to court to protect restrictions on municipal broadband networks.

The House GOP's Border Proposal Has Washington Headed for a Deadlock

The working group's proposals laid out Wednesday morning clash with what the Senate and White House are looking for. And it's not even clear they could make it out of the House.

Show More

Could You Live on $77 a Week?

Minimum-wage advocates begin their 'Live the Wage' challenge

Republicans Announce Plan to Require a Vote on Iran Nuclear Deal

A group of senators said late Wednesday that sanctions would be automatically reimposed if the White House does not consult Congress.

Meriam Ibrahim Is Free From Sudan

She arrived in Rome a day after Congress held a hearing on how to help her. 

'Let Me Google That for You'—Now a Congressional Bill

Some think the government is wasting money on an agency that search engines have made obsolete. One bill would eliminate it altogether.

Why the NSA Keeps Tracking People Even After They're Dead

A newly disclosed government rule book reveals just how easy it is to get placed on a terrorist watch list—and how difficult it can be to get taken off.

The State Department Really Doesn’t Want to Break Up Iraq

A decentralized federal system is best for Iraq and for U.S. interests, a State Department official says.

U.S. Senate Panel Backs Vietnam Nuclear Trade Pact, But Tightens Conditions

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Robert Menendez's measure passed in a bipartisan voice vote and limits the U.S.-Vietnam pact to 30 years.

One State Is Being Sued Over Obamacare Politics

A lawsuit filed Wednesday accuses Tennessee of denying coverage to low-income patients.

The FCC Is Getting Serious About Enforcing Its Last Remaining Net-Neutrality Rule

The agency threatens to crack down on Internet providers that lie about speed.

What Happens When Your Car Gets Hacked?

Connected cars could give cybercriminals a whole new range of targets.

Senate Confirms Creedon for NNSA No. 2 Position

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday confirmed Madelyn Creedon to become the No. 2 official at the National Nuclear Security Administration.

In Iraq, Now What?

Lawmakers question where the U.S. went wrong in military strategy.

9/11 Commission Chair: Congress Is the Biggest Obstacle to Stopping the Next Terrorist Attack

The Department of Homeland Security, the commission, even Congress itself say congressional oversight is out of control.

A One-Step Guide to Infuriating an EPA Official

The agency chief touts her staff's work after a Republican accused her committee of kowtowing to a green group.

Who Voted—and Who Didn't—for U.N. Investigation of Potential War Crimes in Gaza

The U.N. Human Rights Council has announced a probe into military operations in the region, triggering dismay from Israelis and praise from Palestinians.

States Would Sue to Kill City Internet Service

State legislatures threatened to take the FCC to court to protect restrictions on municipal broadband networks.

The House GOP's Border Proposal Has Washington Headed for a Deadlock

The working group's proposals laid out Wednesday morning clash with what the Senate and White House are looking for. And it's not even clear they could make it out of the House.

Show More
 
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