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A Joint Project of the Atlantic and the National Journal

The Next Economy

The Next Economy Latest

The Geography of Debt in the U.S.

Americans along both coasts take on the greatest amount of debt, according to a new study, while Southerners suffer the most from overdue bills.

Looking to Fund a Clean Energy Project? You Need a Green Bank.

New state-run investment funds could create a real marketplace for alternative energy projects—and bring down costs for all of us.

Argentina's Stock Exchange Is Down After World Cup Loss

And Germany's stock exchanged closed up. Coincidence?

For Germany and Argentina, a World Cup Loss Could Mean a Stock-Market Dive

Losing a major soccer game hurts the self-esteem of a nation so much that it affects investor moods.

American Kids Are Really Bad at Handling Money

A new report shows U.S. teenagers falling behind peers in China—and raises concerns about their financial futures.

The Number of Breweries May Be Up, But Beer Consumption Is Still Down

Breweries more than doubled between 2007 and 2012, despite the trend away from beer. The answer: craft beer.

Why Doesn't the Government Track Social Mobility?

Unlike poverty rates, the deficit, and other economic measures, the federal government has no standard way of tracking movement up the income ladder.

Show More

The Geography of Debt in the U.S.

Americans along both coasts take on the greatest amount of debt, according to a new study, while Southerners suffer the most from overdue bills.

Looking to Fund a Clean Energy Project? You Need a Green Bank.

New state-run investment funds could create a real marketplace for alternative energy projects—and bring down costs for all of us.

Argentina's Stock Exchange Is Down After World Cup Loss

And Germany's stock exchanged closed up. Coincidence?

For Germany and Argentina, a World Cup Loss Could Mean a Stock-Market Dive

Losing a major soccer game hurts the self-esteem of a nation so much that it affects investor moods.

American Kids Are Really Bad at Handling Money

A new report shows U.S. teenagers falling behind peers in China—and raises concerns about their financial futures.

The Number of Breweries May Be Up, But Beer Consumption Is Still Down

Breweries more than doubled between 2007 and 2012, despite the trend away from beer. The answer: craft beer.

Why Doesn't the Government Track Social Mobility?

Unlike poverty rates, the deficit, and other economic measures, the federal government has no standard way of tracking movement up the income ladder.

Show More
 
About the Next Economy

The Great Recession upended expectations about economic security in the United States, and it changed the way we work and live. The Next Economy project asks: How are Americans adapting to the new economy? This joint initiative from the Atlantic and National Journal will use polls, an annual special issue, national and local events with thought leaders and this site to answer that question.