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A Joint Project of the Atlantic and the National Journal

The Next Economy

The Next Economy Latest

Argentina's Stock Exchange Is Down After World Cup Loss

And Germany's stock exchanged closed up. Coincidence?

For Germany and Argentina, a World Cup Loss Could Mean a Stock-Market Dive

Losing a major soccer game hurts the self-esteem of a nation so much that it affects investor moods.

American Kids Are Really Bad at Handling Money

A new report shows U.S. teenagers falling behind peers in China—and raises concerns about their financial futures.

The Number of Breweries May Be Up, But Beer Consumption Is Still Down

Breweries more than doubled between 2007 and 2012, despite the trend away from beer. The answer: craft beer.

Why Doesn't the Government Track Social Mobility?

Unlike poverty rates, the deficit, and other economic measures, the federal government has no standard way of tracking movement up the income ladder.

How Cash-Strapped Towns Are Saving Fourth of July Fireworks

Independence Day celebrations are an economic boost for communities. And with budgets tight, there are several ways towns can avoid canceling their shows.

Why Our Retirement System Should Be More Like Australia's

More than 90 percent of employed Australians have retirement savings in government-mandated accounts.

Show More

Argentina's Stock Exchange Is Down After World Cup Loss

And Germany's stock exchanged closed up. Coincidence?

For Germany and Argentina, a World Cup Loss Could Mean a Stock-Market Dive

Losing a major soccer game hurts the self-esteem of a nation so much that it affects investor moods.

American Kids Are Really Bad at Handling Money

A new report shows U.S. teenagers falling behind peers in China—and raises concerns about their financial futures.

The Number of Breweries May Be Up, But Beer Consumption Is Still Down

Breweries more than doubled between 2007 and 2012, despite the trend away from beer. The answer: craft beer.

Why Doesn't the Government Track Social Mobility?

Unlike poverty rates, the deficit, and other economic measures, the federal government has no standard way of tracking movement up the income ladder.

How Cash-Strapped Towns Are Saving Fourth of July Fireworks

Independence Day celebrations are an economic boost for communities. And with budgets tight, there are several ways towns can avoid canceling their shows.

Why Our Retirement System Should Be More Like Australia's

More than 90 percent of employed Australians have retirement savings in government-mandated accounts.

Show More
 
About the Next Economy

The Great Recession upended expectations about economic security in the United States, and it changed the way we work and live. The Next Economy project asks: How are Americans adapting to the new economy? This joint initiative from the Atlantic and National Journal will use polls, an annual special issue, national and local events with thought leaders and this site to answer that question.