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We’re Just 25 Years Away From the World's First Trillionaire. Autocorrect Can’t Even Handle That Word. We’re Just 25 Years Away From the World's First Trillionaire. Autoco...

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Economy

We’re Just 25 Years Away From the World's First Trillionaire. Autocorrect Can’t Even Handle That Word.

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(Andy Dean Photography/Shutterstock)

There are a lot of zeroes in $1 trillion—12 of them to be exact.

And in about 25 years, someone on this planet will be worth that much money, according to financial forecasters.

 

If the world's largest fortunes continue to grow at their current rate, The Telegraph reports, a superrich person will reach trillionaire status by 2039. That amount is the equivalent of $140 for every living person on Earth.

The concept seems so unfathomable that autocorrect plants a red squiggly line under the word "trillionaire," and says there are "no guesses found" for the word. But financial experts have a pretty good idea of who will claim the title in the next few decades.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates' $77.2 billion fortune is expected to top $1 trillion first, when he will be 83 years old. Gates is currently the richest person in the world, according to Forbes' annual list. Other contenders include Mexican business tycoon Carlos Slim ($71.1 billion) and American investor Warren Buffett ($64.9 billion).

 

For America's wealthiest class, owning $1 billion is becoming commonplace. When Forbes first began tracking the fortunes of the richest Americans, people who controlled $75 million made the list. Now the minimum is $1 billion.

The 85 richest people in the world have the same amount of wealth as the bottom half of the global population, according to a January report from Oxfam International, a British humanitarian group.

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