Tea-Party Group to Air TV Ad Attacking Mitch McConnell on Obamacare

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Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell answers questions from reporters in his office in the capitol on Thursday, June 21, 2012. 
National Journal
Shane Goldmacher
Sept. 5, 2013, 6:20 a.m.

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A lead­ing tea-party group, the Sen­ate Con­ser­vat­ives Fund, has booked a $340,000 tele­vi­sion-ad buy in Ken­tucky at­tack­ing Sen­ate Minor­ity Lead­er Mitch Mc­Con­nell for his fail­ure to join the move­ment to de­fund Obama­care.

“Mc­Con­nell’s the Sen­ate Re­pub­lic­an lead­er, but he re­fuses to lead on de­fund­ing Obama­care,” says the ad, a copy of which was shared with Na­tion­al Journ­al. “What good is a lead­er like that?”

The ad is set to air from Sept. 6 through Sept. 17, ac­cord­ing to the group.

The Sen­ate Con­ser­vat­ives Fund, which was foun­ded by former Sen. Jim De­Mint but is now in­de­pend­ent of him, has not en­dorsed Mc­Con­nell’s Re­pub­lic­an primary op­pon­ent, Matt Bev­in. The group, however, is openly con­sid­er­ing do­ing so and its ex­ec­ut­ive dir­ect­or, Matt Hoskins, said in Ju­ly that Mc­Con­nell “needs to con­sider wheth­er it might be time to hang it up.” The fight to de­fund Pres­id­ent Obama’s health care law faces a key Oct. 1 dead­line, and the ad says, “Tell Mitch Mc­Con­nell to join the fight to stop Obama­care, be­fore it’s too late.”

In a state­ment, Hoskins said, “If there was ever a time when Ken­tucky needed Mitch Mc­Con­nell to de­liv­er, it is now. We hope he listens to the voters and finds the cour­age to lead.”

This is not the group’s first anti-Mc­Con­nell ad but the first one on tele­vi­sion. At the end of Au­gust, the Sen­ate Con­ser­vat­ives Fund paid $47,000 for a two-week ra­dio buy ur­ging Mc­Con­nell to join the de­fund Obama­care move­ment.

The group, which has had the back­ing of Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, has also aired crit­ic­al ra­dio ads tar­get­ing Sens. Richard Burr, R-N.C., Lind­sey Gra­ham, R-S.C., Lamar Al­ex­an­der, R-Tenn., Johnny Isak­son, R-Geor­gia, Thad Co­chran, R-Miss., and Jeff Flake, R-Ar­iz.

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