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Three the Hard Way

Three new polls all show de Blasio flirting with 40 percent.

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Sept. 9, 2013, 7:27 a.m.

Three new polls of the Demo­crat­ic New York City may­or­al primary show Pub­lic Ad­voc­ate Bill de Bla­sio (D) with a com­mand­ing lead. The trio of polls in­dic­ate that de Bla­sio has a chance of win­ning the 40% ne­ces­sary to avoid a run­off, while former Comp­troller Bill Thompson (D) and City Coun­cil Speak­er Christine Quinn (D) are in a battle for second place.

A Quin­nipi­ac Uni­versity poll (Sept. 6-8, 782 LVs; +/- 3.5%) shows de Bla­sio lead­ing Thompson, 39-25%. Quinn fin­ishes third with 18%, while former Rep. An­thony Wein­er (D) re­ceives 6%. Comp­troller John Liu (D) garners 4%, and former Coun­cil­man Sal Al­banese (D) re­ceives 1%. (re­lease)

In a new WN­BC-TV/Wall Street Journ­al/Mar­ist poll (Sept. 3-6; 556 LVs; +/- 4.2%), de Bla­sio leads with 36%, while Thompson and Quinn are tied with 20% apiece. Wein­er re­ceives 7%0, and Liu garners 5%. None of the oth­er can­did­ates tested re­ceive more than 1%. (re­lease)

In a Pub­lic Policy Polling poll (D) (IVR) (Sept. 7-8; 683 LVs; +/- 3.8%), de Bla­sio re­ceives 38%, fol­lowed by Thompson at 19% and Quinn at 13%. Wein­er re­ceives 9%, while Liu fin­ishes at 5%. None of the oth­er can­did­ates tested re­ceive more than 3 per­cent. (re­lease)

De Bla­sio has a sol­id shot at win­ning the primary out­right on Tues­day. If he fails to reach 40 per­cent, Thompson ap­pears more likely than Quinn to fin­ish second and ad­vance to the run­off. Polling shows that de Bla­sio would be­gin the run­off cam­paign with a large lead over either Demo­crat, al­though Thompson may have a bet­ter chance of cut­ting in­to his ad­vant­age giv­en Quinn’s high neg­at­ives.

BLOOMBERG BASHES BILL: Dur­ing an in­ter­view with New York Magazine, May­or Mi­chael Bloomberg (I) in­ter­rup­ted a ques­tion about de Bla­sio that clas­si­fied his bid as a “class-war­fare cam­paign.” Bloomberg said: “Class-war­fare and ra­cist. … Well, no, no, I mean he’s mak­ing an ap­peal us­ing his fam­ily to gain sup­port. I think it’s pretty ob­vi­ous to any­one watch­ing what he’s been do­ing. I do not think he him­self is ra­cist. It’s com­par­able to me point­ing out I’m Jew­ish in at­tract­ing the Jew­ish vote. You tail­or mes­sages to your audi­ences and ad­dress is­sues you think your audi­ence cares about.”

Cap­it­al New York’s Pay­barah writes: “Bloomberg is fam­ously un­pre­dict­able in in­ter­views. But though his aides got the quote amended in the on­line ver­sion of the story, it hasn’t done much to lessen the polit­ic­al im­pact of the com­ment. For de Bla­sio, who is lead­ing in the latest pub­lic opin­ion polls, the rhet­or­ic from Bloomberg is a gift, giv­ing him one more talk­ing point as he seeks to drive up his sup­port among Demo­crat­ic voters by high­light­ing his con­nec­tions, through his fam­ily, to the out­er bor­oughs, pub­lic schools and the Afric­an-Amer­ic­an com­munity.”

“Wherever Mr. de Bla­sio went on Sunday, he tried to cap­it­al­ize on the may­or’s com­ments.” (New York Times)

FI­NAL GOP DE­BATE: Former MTA chair­man Joe Lhota (R) and bil­lion­aire John Cat­sima­tid­is (R) “made their fi­nal pitch to Re­pub­lic­an voters on Sunday, clash­ing at a de­bate on WN­BC-TV in which Mr. Lhota sought to leave the im­pres­sion Mr. Cat­sima­tid­is was not a ser­i­ous can­did­ate, and Mr. Cat­sima­tid­is ar­gued that Mr. Lhota was a mean­spir­ited tech­no­crat who lacked big ideas.”

Cat­sima­tid­is said he had a “love factor with the minor­it­ies. … They all give me hugs.”

Lhota said: “I’m not the anti-kit­ten can­did­ate. We have thou­sands of cats — lit­er­ally thou­sands of cats — that are in the sub­way sys­tem every single day, day and night, scur­ry­ing across the tracks, and they don’t get killed.” (New York Times)

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