Poll: Republicans Know How to Message on Obamacare. Democrats Don’t.

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) (C) heads for a House Republican caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol October 4, 2013 in Washington, DC. 'This isn't some damn game,' Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) said about the current federal government shutdown.
National Journal
Clara Ritger
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Clara Ritger
Oct. 7, 2013, 5:51 a.m.

Re­pub­lic­ans have been bet­ter than Demo­crats at Obama­care mes­saging, ac­cord­ing to Na­tion­al Journ­al‘s Polit­ic­al In­siders.

Roughly 50 per­cent of Demo­crats and 59 per­cent of Re­pub­lic­ans sur­veyed say the GOP takes the cake when it comes to ef­fect­ive mes­saging about the pres­id­ent’s sig­na­ture health re­form law.

“The GOP has done a good job scar­ing a lot of Amer­ic­ans,” wrote one Demo­crat­ic re­spon­der.

“Has there been Demo­crat­ic mes­saging?” wrote an­oth­er.

The sur­vey, con­duc­ted Sept. 30 through Oct. 2, polled 89 Demo­crats and 100 Re­pub­lic­an Polit­ic­al In­siders. When the Af­ford­able Care Act ex­changes opened for en­roll­ment on Oct. 1, con­sumers faced web­site glitches which pre­ven­ted some from sign­ing up for in­sur­ance.

“The glitches, flaws and im­ple­ment­a­tion delays all con­trib­ute to the GOP ef­fort,” noted a Re­pub­lic­an re­spon­der.

However, not all agreed that the GOP ef­forts have been suc­cess­ful. A small group of re­spon­ders ““ 25 per­cent of Demo­crats and 12 per­cent of Re­pub­lic­ans ““ thought the Demo­crats have been more ef­fect­ive in their Obama­care mes­saging, with some at­trib­ut­ing the Re­pub­lic­an fail­ure to the right-most con­tin­gent of the party.

“We’re liv­ing in an echo cham­ber while Obama is aim­ing for middle-of-the-road voters who hate Con­gress even more than they dis­like Obama­care,” wrote a Re­pub­lic­an re­spon­der.

But 25 per­cent of Demo­crats and 29 per­cent of Re­pub­lic­ans said neither party has done a good job.

“Demo­crats have failed to ex­plain what it is and why people should care,” wrote a Re­pub­lic­an re­spon­der. “Re­pub­lic­ans have failed to of­fer an al­tern­at­ive. F grades to both.”

See full poll res­ults here.

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