Republicans Are Fed Up With Republicans

Twenty-seven percent of Republicans don’t like their own party right now.

Reporters and photographers question Speaker of the House John Boehner.
National Journal
Brian Resnick
Add to Briefcase
See more stories about...
Brian Resnick
Oct. 9, 2013, 11:42 a.m.

Fa­vor­ab­il­ity rat­ings for Re­pub­lic­ans are at his­tor­ic lows.

Ac­cord­ing to the latest from Gal­lup, 62 per­cent of Amer­ic­ans now view the Grand Old Party un­fa­vor­ably, with the num­bers rising sharply in re­cent weeks. Dis­like of Demo­crats has in­creased as well, but by a tiny de­gree in com­par­is­on.

Re­pub­lic­ans haven’t been this des­pised since the end of 2008, right be­fore Demo­crats rushed in­to the House and Sen­ate in a wave.

But per­haps more in­ter­est­ing is Gal­lup’s in­spec­tion of how Re­pub­lic­ans feel about their own party. The head­lines about Re­pub­lic­ans lately re­flect a fis­sure in the party, and polls may have tapped in­to that. The Gal­lup poll finds that Re­pub­lic­ans are twice as likely to view their own party un­fa­vor­ably than Demo­crats. Twenty-sev­en per­cent of Re­pub­lic­ans don’t like their own party right now, and that’s rising at a great­er rate when com­pared to self-hat­ing Demo­crats.

“The GOP’s un­fa­vor­able rat­ing among Re­pub­lic­ans is up 8 points from Septem­ber, com­pared with a 1-point rise in Demo­crat­ic Party un­fa­vor­ables among Demo­crats,” Gal­lup re­por­ted. The poll was con­duc­ted between Oct. 3 and Oct. 6 among a ran­dom sample of 1,028 and has a mar­gin of er­ror of plus or minus 4 per­cent­age points.

Re­pub­lic­an dis­pleas­ure with Re­pub­lic­ans was bub­bling up be­fore the gov­ern­ment shut­down. A week be­fore the shut­down, 51 per­cent of Re­pub­lic­an re­spond­ents in a United Tech­no­lo­gies/Na­tion­al Journ­al Con­gres­sion­al Con­nec­tion Poll said Con­gress should con­tin­ue fund­ing the gov­ern­ment and deal with Obama­care af­ter­ward. Their lead­ers did the op­pos­ite, in­sist­ing that the con­tinu­ing res­ol­u­tion be tied to changes in the Af­ford­able Care Act.

But as has been re­por­ted, na­tion­al polls might not be so im­port­ant for the polit­ic­al fu­ture of cer­tain Re­pub­lic­an le­gis­lat­ors in deep-red ger­ry­mandered dis­tricts. They have to worry about win­ning primar­ies against con­ser­vat­ive op­pon­ents, not ad­just­ing to a na­tion­al sen­ti­ment. In fact, they may have good reas­on to dig their heels in and con­front Obama­care and the Demo­crats un­yield­ingly.

What We're Following See More »
$618 BILLION IN FUNDING
By a Big Margin, House Passes Defense Bill
1 days ago
THE DETAILS

The National Defense Authorization Act passed the House this morning by a 375-34 vote. The bill, which heads to the Senate next week for final consideration, would fund the military to the tune of $618.7 billion, "about $3.2 billion more than the president requested for fiscal 2017. ... The White House has issued a veto threat on both the House and Senate-passed versions of the bill, but has not yet said if it will sign the compromise bill released by the conference committee this week."

Source:
SUCCEEDS UPTON
Walden to Chair Energy and Commerce Committee
1 days ago
THE DETAILS

"Republicans have elected Rep. Greg Walden (R-OR) the next chairman of the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee. Walden defeated Reps. John Shimkus (R-IL) and Joe Barton (R-TX), the former committee chairman, in the race for the gavel" to succeed Michgan's Fred Upton.

Source:
BIPARTISAN SUPPORT
Senators Looking to Limit Deportations Under Trump
2 days ago
THE DETAILS

"Democratic and Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee are working on legislation that would limit deportations" under President-elect Donald Trump. Leading the effort are Judiciary Committee members Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC). Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) is also expected to sign on.

Source:
REQUIRES CHANGE IN LAW
Trump Taps Mattis for Defense Secretary
2 days ago
BREAKING

Donald Trump has selected retired Marine Gen. James 'Mad Dog' Mattis as his secretary of defense, according to The Washington Post. Mattis retired from active duty just four years ago, so Congress will have "to pass new legislation to bypass a federal law that states secretaries of defense must not have been on active duty in the previous seven years." The official announcement is likely to come next week.

Source:
MEASURE HEADED TO OBAMA
Senate OKs 10-Year Extension of Iran Sanctions
2 days ago
THE LATEST
×
×

Welcome to National Journal!

You are currently accessing National Journal from IP access. Please login to access this feature. If you have any questions, please contact your Dedicated Advisor.

Login