Republicans Are Fed Up With Republicans

Twenty-seven percent of Republicans don’t like their own party right now.

Reporters and photographers question Speaker of the House John Boehner.
National Journal
Brian Resnick
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Brian Resnick
Oct. 9, 2013, 11:42 a.m.

Fa­vor­ab­il­ity rat­ings for Re­pub­lic­ans are at his­tor­ic lows.

Ac­cord­ing to the latest from Gal­lup, 62 per­cent of Amer­ic­ans now view the Grand Old Party un­fa­vor­ably, with the num­bers rising sharply in re­cent weeks. Dis­like of Demo­crats has in­creased as well, but by a tiny de­gree in com­par­is­on.

Re­pub­lic­ans haven’t been this des­pised since the end of 2008, right be­fore Demo­crats rushed in­to the House and Sen­ate in a wave.

But per­haps more in­ter­est­ing is Gal­lup’s in­spec­tion of how Re­pub­lic­ans feel about their own party. The head­lines about Re­pub­lic­ans lately re­flect a fis­sure in the party, and polls may have tapped in­to that. The Gal­lup poll finds that Re­pub­lic­ans are twice as likely to view their own party un­fa­vor­ably than Demo­crats. Twenty-sev­en per­cent of Re­pub­lic­ans don’t like their own party right now, and that’s rising at a great­er rate when com­pared to self-hat­ing Demo­crats.

“The GOP’s un­fa­vor­able rat­ing among Re­pub­lic­ans is up 8 points from Septem­ber, com­pared with a 1-point rise in Demo­crat­ic Party un­fa­vor­ables among Demo­crats,” Gal­lup re­por­ted. The poll was con­duc­ted between Oct. 3 and Oct. 6 among a ran­dom sample of 1,028 and has a mar­gin of er­ror of plus or minus 4 per­cent­age points.

Re­pub­lic­an dis­pleas­ure with Re­pub­lic­ans was bub­bling up be­fore the gov­ern­ment shut­down. A week be­fore the shut­down, 51 per­cent of Re­pub­lic­an re­spond­ents in a United Tech­no­lo­gies/Na­tion­al Journ­al Con­gres­sion­al Con­nec­tion Poll said Con­gress should con­tin­ue fund­ing the gov­ern­ment and deal with Obama­care af­ter­ward. Their lead­ers did the op­pos­ite, in­sist­ing that the con­tinu­ing res­ol­u­tion be tied to changes in the Af­ford­able Care Act.

But as has been re­por­ted, na­tion­al polls might not be so im­port­ant for the polit­ic­al fu­ture of cer­tain Re­pub­lic­an le­gis­lat­ors in deep-red ger­ry­mandered dis­tricts. They have to worry about win­ning primar­ies against con­ser­vat­ive op­pon­ents, not ad­just­ing to a na­tion­al sen­ti­ment. In fact, they may have good reas­on to dig their heels in and con­front Obama­care and the Demo­crats un­yield­ingly.

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